Blog Archives

  Very Real Risks Many respiratory diseases are almost exclusively caused by workplace exposures, including silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, and chronic beryllium disease. There are currently approximately 12,000 deaths each year in the UK due to occupational respiratory diseases, about two-thirds of which were due to asbestos-related diseases or COPD. In Ontario, COPD prevalence increased by […]

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Very Real Risks

Many respiratory diseases are almost exclusively caused by workplace exposures, including silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, and chronic beryllium disease.
  • There are currently approximately 12,000 deaths each year in the UK due to occupational respiratory diseases, about two-thirds of which were due to asbestos-related diseases or COPD.
  • In Ontario, COPD prevalence increased by almost 65% between 1996 and 2007, and individuals with COPD account for one-fifth to one-third of all health care services used. The impact on individuals and on society, owing to reduced productivity and increased demands on the health care system, is substantial.

Respiratory Protection

  • Respirators protect workers by preventing exposures to harmful airborne chemical and biological agents.
  • However, a respirator that is not used properly will fail to provide adequate protection, and may even cause certain hazardous conditions.
 

Types of Protection:

• Dust Masks • Air-Purifying Respirators • Atmosphere-Supplying Respirators

Types of Respirators

• Tight Fitting Respirators. • Loose Fitting PAPR- (Powered Air Purifying Respirator)

Classes of Respirators

• Positive Pressure Respirator- When inhaling, the pressure inside the respirator is kept higher than outside the respirator. • Negative Pressure Respirator- When inhaling, the pressure inside the respirator is less than outside the respirator.

Tight Fitting Respirators:

Half-Face Cartridge Respirator

[caption id="attachment_17057" align="alignleft" width="387"]respiratory mask • Half-mask APR with twin cartridges[/caption] • These can be used for protection against gases, vapors, or particulates. • Cartridges contain a filtering and/or adsorbing media that removes contaminants from the air. Thus the type of cartridge is selected based on the anticipated contaminant(s) in the work environment. • Cartridges attach to the respirator inlets, so air entering the face-piece is purified before it is inhaled by the respirator wearer. • On the front of the mask is an exhalation outlet with a one-way valve that allows air to leave the face-piece.

Full-Face Cartridge Respirator

Full face-piece respirators are used when a higher level of respiratory protection is needed, or when protection of the eyes and face is important.

[caption id="attachment_17053" align="alignright" width="312"] Full facepiece APR[/caption]
Examples:
1. Hazardous waste bulking, in which there may be high atmospheric concentrations of vapors
2. Jobs involving chemicals that are irritating to the eyes
3. Pesticide or herbicide spraying, where overspray may contact the eyes
4. Research animal care, where allergens can affect the eyes as well as the respiratory system.
• Like the simpler half-face respirator, full face-pieces have interchangeable cartridges that are selected on the basis of anticipated respiratory hazard(s)
 

Disposable Filtering Face-piece Respirators

• Filtering face-piece respirators are intended to protect against particles, although some models may contain an activated charcoal media to control odors or vapors; however, this type of respirator is not recommended if you have potential exposure to gases or vapors. Oil-resistance is indicated by N, R, or P: • "N" means that the respirator is not resistant to oil • “R” is more resistant to oil • “P” is most resistant, and is often considered “oil-proof” N-95 is the minimum level of efficiency that is acceptable for protection against hazardous particulates: • Respirators with greater filtration efficiency are available (e.g. N-97 and N-100, R-97 and R-100, P-97 and P-100) • An N -, R-, or P-100 filter is also called a High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter because it is nearly 100% effective at filtering test particles

N-95 or higher disposable respirators are effective for hazard reduction when working with infectious agents:

• Greater levels of protection might be required for specific agents or protocols.

Eye and face protection can be worn with disposable filtering facepiece respirators:

• E.g. goggles and/or face shield worn with disposable respirator in Biosafety Level 3 facilities

“Canister” Respirators

Canisters are sometimes used instead of cartridges for gas and vapor respirators, because more sorbent material can fit in a canister

These tend to be heavier than cartridge-using APRs, and are not widely used in some countries

Loose Fitting PAPR Hood:

Powered Air Purifying Respirator Hood

PAPRs are useful for work environments where traditional full face-piece respirators are not acceptable.

Example: if the work environment is hot with high humidity the traditional full face-piece respirator might fog up.

Loose Fitting PAPR Helmet:

[caption id="attachment_17051" align="aligncenter" width="252"] SAR- Supplied Air Respirator Example.[/caption] Powered Air Purifying Respirator Helmet Air is circulated through the helmet to provide a cooling effect & reduces fog.  

Positive Pressure Respirator

PAPR-Powered Air- Purifying Respirators- Cannot be used in IDLH atmospheres.

Atmosphere Supplying Respirators

Atmosphere Supplying Respirators can be used in atmospheres where the hazard is unknown or IDLH. [caption id="attachment_17056" align="aligncenter" width="482"] SCBA- Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus.[/caption] [post_title] => Respirators, Masks and Filter Types, Organized & Explained [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => respirators-masks-filter-types-organized-explained [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-04-18 17:34:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-04-18 17:34:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=17043 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

5 Ideas for Using Your Safety Budget Effectively At many large organizations, you can get whatever you need and want. However, an unlimited safety budget isn’t in the cards for most companies. More often than not, you’ll need to work within tight monetary constraints to meet your safety needs. This can be a problem when […]

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5 Ideas for Using Your Safety Budget Effectively

At many large organizations, you can get whatever you need and want. However, an unlimited safety budget isn’t in the cards for most companies. More often than not, you’ll need to work within tight monetary constraints to meet your safety needs. This can be a problem when there seems to be a cost to everything, and you have to pick-and-choose what works and what doesn’t.

When faced with the impossible task of budgeting the health and safety of your workers, the key is to use your funds and resources only on those things that really matter. This is especially important for small business owners who want a safe work environment without breaking the bank.

With the right plan in place, you don’t have to sacrifice your workers or your money—you can have the best of both worlds. Here are our five ideas for using your safety budget effectively and efficiently.

1. Purchase Quality

You might be tempted to save the most money by stretching your budget and purchasing discount personal protection equipment (PPE). This is the wrong move. Skimping on quality when it comes to PPE and other equipment could be disastrous and cost you more in the long run.

Yes, it might seem more economical to buy the $20 (CAD) TPR (Thermal Protective Rubber) Gloves that meet the requirements and regulations compared to the $180 (CAD) ones, but you get what you pay for. Higher quality equipment is, typically, more comfortable, offers better functionality, and includes additional features. This might seem extraneous, but if the gloves are more comfortable and easier to use, then there’s a MUCH better chance that your employees will actually use them.

To save money when buying quality, try buying in bulk. Many companies will offer discounts if you purchase more than one item at a time. Or you can contact a supplier to see if they can get a better price than what you find online or in store.

2. Safety Training

Safety training is probably the number one most cost-effective way to protect your business and your employees. Training your employees to handle hazards and to react appropriately in an emergency will keep you from additional trouble in the long run. And third-party training doesn’t have to kill your budget.

At TriTech, you receive excellent training from high-quality instructors, and you can choose what works for you. The most affordable option is to send your employees to a pre-scheduled training course, but there are also options for on-site training as well as custom corporate training—if you want to train all your employees at once.

And TriTech gives you a lot for your money. They offer excellent administrative support before, during, and after. Plus there are NO cancellation or no-show fees as well as no class minimums.

3. Determine Needs VS Wants

What your business needs to be safe is not the same as what you want. For example, you might need to hold a safety meeting once a month, but it doesn’t need to be a two-day extravaganza with breakfast and lunch. Sometimes it’s better to hold a meeting more often and keep it short and sweet to cut down on costs and loss of work productivity.

There are also times to splurge and times not to. While we already mentioned that quality is important, there’s no need to splurge on a $340 (CAD) pair of slip resistant, steel toe boots when a $125 pair is just as effective. Make sure before you make any purchase that it falls under the “need” category.

4. Hire Smartly

You’ll save a lot of money if you hire the right employees in the beginning. When you’re short on staff, it can be tempting to hire the first people you come across just to get people in the door, but this is a mistake. Hiring an incompetent worker is a surefire way to increase your risk of injuries on the job site.

Instead, you should carefully screen all your candidates and spend your budget on finding new employees with the skills and experience you need to get the job done. This means you’ll need to take the hiring process more slowly and include supervisors and other employees in the process to make sure you do the job correctly.

5. Keep Up with Maintenance

It’s much more cost effective to keep your current equipment running efficiently than to have to always purchase new equipment. Keeping your systems in top working order can extend their life cycle. In the end, spending a couple thousand a month to keep your large equipment in tip-top-shape for over a decade is much more budget friendly than having to spend tens of thousands of dollars to replace your equipment every few years.

Plus, regular maintenance improves your efficiency. Equipment that operates at its full capacity will help you get more work done in less time. And well-maintained equipment has less downtime, so you don’t lose productivity.

Even a tight safety budget doesn’t have to slow you down. Just remember, there are a lot of right answers and every company should use their safety budget in the best way for them. The key is to spend your money on items and opportunities that keep your workers safe and the future of your company protected.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses.
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  5 Tips About OH&S Standards You Need To Know Dealing with OH&S Standards (Occupational Health & Safety) isn’t always easy. There are many different workplace safety issues that need to be handled if you want to stay in compliance with the acts, regulations, and codes of practice. So, how do you ensure that your […]

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5 Tips About OH&S Standards You Need To Know

Dealing with OH&S Standards (Occupational Health & Safety) isn’t always easy. There are many different workplace safety issues that need to be handled if you want to stay in compliance with the acts, regulations, and codes of practice. So, how do you ensure that your company stays up to date on the latest information and practices so that you’re not saddled with an unexpected fine, citation, or legal struggle?

Follow these five tips for dealing with the OH&S act in your workplace.
 
 

1. Get the Right Advice

The law expects you, as an employer, to understand what health and safety needs are required of you. It’s your responsibility, but most of us don’t have the time to review every regulation or all the OH&S Standards, to make sure we’re protected. That’s where the advice of a qualified health and safety person, such as the experts at TriTech, is invaluable.

Hiring an external safety consultant is the same concept as hiring a lawyer to handle your legal affairs or an accountant to help with your finances.

A consultant can give you advice on: - Establishing, maintaining, and improving safe system at work; - Identifying, eliminating, and controlling workplace hazards - Necessary actions to eliminate and reduce workplace risk - Employee training needs

This type of advice is invaluable and can give you the help you need to protect not only your employees but your company as well.

2. Start at the Beginning

You can’t afford to skip steps that comply with OH&S standards when it comes to creating a culture of safety in your workplace. Business owners are ultimately responsible for all safety issues, so it’s vitally important that you start by writing a health and safety policy that clearly outlines your commitment to safety.
Keep your policy simple, but make sure that you include a set of objectives and specific responsibilities allocated to your managers, supervisors, and workers. These clearly written documents will act as a baseline guide for your health and safety program and will ensure that you stay in compliance even as employees come and go.

3. Identify and Control Risks

You won’t know if you comply with OH&S standards unless you understand the health and safety risks in your workplace. This includes identifying all hazards, regularly conducting inspections, analyzing incident data, and using an external auditor to inspect your business.
Once you’ve identified all the risks and hazards, start controlling them by taking care of the most dangerous risk first. Then, try to eliminate each hazard or substitute it with something safer when that is the better option. Make sure you keep a documented record of your actions to ensure that all legal requirements are met.

4. Consult Your Employees

As a business owner, making a unilateral decision for a safe workplace won’t be successful if you don’t involve your workers. Under OHS legislation, employers are required to have appropriate consultation arrangement in place. These include forums such as committees, elected representatives, and designated work groups.
You should regularly consult these groups on all safety manners to ensure that the lines of communication remain open and that effective safety measures can be established. It’s best if you schedule regular safety meetings and keep a documented record of the agreed actions that result.

5. Schedule Appropriate Training

The OH&S doesn’t care about your intentions; they care about your actions. The best-laid plans are worthless without the necessary training to see it carried out. Your workers should always be aware of all the risks, changes, and procedures involved with their job, and when necessary, they should be trained to handle specific duties related to their jobs.
Before scheduling training, make sure you take into consideration the needs of your employees culturally, linguistically, and based on your industry. And make sure that you evaluate the competency of your workers on a regular basis to determine what is required to stay operating in a safe manner. At TriTech, we offer courses on first aid, basic rescue, confined spaces, fall protection, and more.
It’s possible to transform your workplace into an OH&S standards compliant business, as long as you take it one step at a time and hire the help you need. TriTech is a locally owned company, in Grand Prairie, offering safety and training services. We can help you create a culture of safety, so you don’t have to worry about it.
 
 
TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses.
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Canadian First Aid Preparedness Infographic All of us hope that we will never be in a situation that requires the use of First Aid skills, like CPR. But the truth is that many of us have, or will be in a position during our lifetime, where our knowledge of Canadian First Aid or Standard First Aid […]

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Canadian First Aid Preparedness Infographic

All of us hope that we will never be in a situation that requires the use of First Aid skills, like CPR. But the truth is that many of us have, or will be in a position during our lifetime, where our knowledge of Canadian First Aid or Standard First Aid could save the life of someone in need.

The Canadian Red Cross has found that most Canadians are not prepared for such a circumstance. What can we do personally to make sure that we are more prepared in the case of an emergency?

The following infographic will educate us on the Basic First Aid training we need and show us where we can go to receive that training.

This Infographic will be covering whether or not we are prepared for an emergency, consider a few of the most common emergency situations and what you should know about them, and where you can get the proper training to assist in helping out in one of these emergency situations.  

Canadians and First Aid Infographic

We hope that you found our infographic on Canadian First Aid Preparedness informative.

You can Download the pdf version here:

TriTech Safety's First Aid Infographic

  The information in this Canadian First Aid Infographic is taken from one of our eBooks that TriTech Safety & Training has written and published entitled: The TiTech Safety & Training Standard First Aid Digital Toolbox  
 

TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents.

We offer courses in Standard First Aid, Emergency First Aid, Emergency Response and First Aid Recertifications.

For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses.

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9 Days To An Amazing Company Safety Program Investing into your workplace is money well spent. Companies with effective and efficient safety programs receive many benefits including fewer workplace injuries and claims, improved company morale, and lower insurance premiums. In fact, well-developed safety policies and in-depth employee training will not only protect your investment and […]

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9 Days To An Amazing Company Safety Program

Investing into your workplace is money well spent. Companies with effective and efficient safety programs receive many benefits including fewer workplace injuries and claims, improved company morale, and lower insurance premiums. In fact, well-developed safety policies and in-depth employee training will not only protect your investment and save you money in the long run, but it will also ensure that your company is around for years to come.

The question is, “How do you make an effective company safety program?” It doesn’t require months of planning or even weeks of work. You can develop an amazing and efficient safety program in just nine days.
 
 

Day 1: Commit to Safety

It might sound obvious, but the first step to your company’s safety is your commitment to it. Not only do your company’s executives need to be on board with a new safety program, but it should also rank highly with all managers and leaders. Management can then demonstrate their commitment to safety and instill that same commitment in their subordinates so that all employees follow the safety procedures.

Day 2: Set Your Safety Goals and Objectives

While it’s an important goal to “avoid all incidents” that goal is too broad to be effective for your company. Instead, you should develop specific goals and objectives based on your company and your employees.

This requires you to gather as much information as possible about the current conditions in your workplace. Commit to reviewing each job and taking it apart step-by-step in order to create goals/objectives around each.

Day 3: Determine Your Workplace Risks

You can’t develop a safety program if you don’t know your risks, hazards, and needs. The first key is to review your workplace and determine what areas, situations, and events have the potential to cause harm.

These are the risks that face you and your employees, and you are required to eliminate as much risk as possible to protect your employees.

You should break down the risks between:

Workplace these are hazards in the workplace such as layout, stairs, etc. Activity: these are risks such as using heavy machinery. Environmental: these hazards are related to things such as dust from heavy machinery use.

Day 4: Create a Written Plan

Once you’ve figured out where your risks are, the next step is to create a written plan/process that stipulates the safety requirements for every situation. By writing out your plan and requirements, you create an easy-to-read template that any employee and leader in your company can refer to and follow in any given situation.

Some commonly written plans include:

  •     Hazard communication program
  •     Personal protective equipment
  •     Emergency action plans
  •     Electrical safety
  •     Fire prevention plan

Day 5: Identify Your Workplace Training Needs

The key to any safety program is training. Your company’s safety policies are only as effective as your employees: the ones who will benefit most from a safe workplace.

The first step is to determine what type of training each employee requires. Based on your risk assessment and written plans, you should be able to determine the types of training courses that are required. If you’re not sure where to start, we recommend reviewing TriTech’s safety courses such as Standard First Aid, Confined Space Awareness, and Fall Protection for ideas.

Day 6: Create a Training Plan

Once you know what safety training you need, you need to set up a plan for training. Some courses can be completed once and last for three years. Other training may need to be more ongoing for the best results.

The key is to create a training plan that doesn’t disrupt your work environment. One way to do this is to schedule a private training session on-site to work with all your employees at once. Or you can schedule off-site training for each employee on a rotational basis so your work never stops but your employees are trained.

Day 7: Set Up a System of Checks and Balances

No matter how well trained your employees are they need a set of checks and balances to ensure that the safety rules and policies are being followed.

These checks and balances can be everything from creating a system to review hazard controls to ensure that none have failed and new hazards haven’t appeared to implementing a disciplinary system to punish employees who don’t follow the appropriate safe work procedures.

Day 8: Develop a Feedback System

An amazing company safety program has to be accepted by all of your employees. In fact, safety should be a condition of employment. Workplace safety is the responsibility of all personnel, so you need a system in place to receive feedback about the effectiveness of your program as well as ideas for improvement or modification.

This system should also allow you to recognize those employees that adhere to the program.

Day 9: Hire an Outside Expert to Review

Finally, once you have your safety program set up to a level where you feel comfortable, it’s important to bring in an outside expert for their opinion. This expert can help you review your safety processes for strengths and weaknesses, helping you look for a way to improve them. They can come in with a fresh eye to ensure that you’re following all safety policies as laid out by the government and to help you take corrective action.

Developing a company safety program is one of the best things you can do for your business. By taking the process one step at a time, you can ensure that nothing is forgotten and that the program is created and implemented in a timely manner, for the best results.

 
 

TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses.

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AEDs & CPR Save Lives. I Am Living Proof Of That. By Mark Malekoff On April 2nd, 2017, I survived a Cardiac Arrest. I was playing hockey at the Kev’s Kids Charity Hockey Tournament. During the last period of the final game, I started feeling light headed, my chest was pounding, and I couldn’t catch my […]

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AEDs & CPR Save Lives. I Am Living Proof Of That.

By Mark Malekoff

On April 2nd, 2017, I survived a Cardiac Arrest.

I was playing hockey at the Kev's Kids Charity Hockey Tournament. During the last period of the final game, I started feeling light headed, my chest was pounding, and I couldn't catch my breath... all the signs of something wrong, but I shrugged them off as I was battling a sinus cold and figured it "wasn't a big deal." Also, with no previous heart-related issues, or any previous family history of heart issues, and being a pretty healthy individual (former hockey player for Grande Prairie Storm and Michigan Technological University and also a former CrossFit regional athlete) not once did it cross my mind that it was something serious. After the game, back in the dressing room, the symptoms got worse, and I eventually collapsed. I had two teammates left in the room with me, Kevin Bjornson and Chad Goldie. They put me in the recovery position, but then I turned blue and was barely breathing... I was suffering from cardiac arrest - the abrupt loss of my heart's function. My heart was in ventricular fibrillation, a lethal heart arrhythmia. It wasn't a heart attack but was a malfunction in my heart's electrical system. Only about 8-15% of cardiac arrest victims survive, however if an AED is put on within the first minute, the survival rate is 95%. Each minute that passes, the survival rate drops by 7-10%. Nicholas Cross and Rob Short, two players on the other team, heard the commotion and joined Kevin and Chad. I received CPR, and an AED was retrieved from the lobby. I received a shock from the AED, which brought my heart out of the ventricular fibrillation arrhythmia, but then my heart went into a less dangerous, but still potentially harmful arrhythmia, ventricular tachycardia. CPR continued while the AED continued to monitor my heart but did not deliver any more shocks. The paramedics then arrived, and I was shocked again, cardioverted, in the ambulance on the way to the hospital. I woke up in the hospital, very out of sorts, with a very sore chest. I ended up spending a total of 2 weeks in the hospital, here in Grande Prairie and Edmonton, doing more tests. There was no permanent damage, my heart's mechanics are totally healthy, but yet I had this episode. I was given a diagnosis of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation, which means there is currently no reason why this event happened. As a result of this diagnosis, I received a Boston Scientific S-ICD. This device will protect me in case this was to happen again. My story is tremendously fortunate, however not all cardiac arrest victims are so fortunate... In May 2012, Brock Ruether, a 16-year-old Fairview, AB high school student, collapsed and died while playing volleyball, Brock's parents – Kim and Wayne Ruether - created Project Brock in his memory with a goal of having an AED in every school in Alberta and to raise awareness of cardiac arrest. I am tremendously thankful that God had the right people and technology available in my situation. I am so thankful for Kevin, Chad, Nick and Rob and the actions they took to save my life. I wanted a way to say thank you, but what do you get someone that saved your life?? I decided that I wanted to support Project Brock's goals and would donate an AED to a school on behalf of Kevin, Chad, Nick and Rob. I spoke with Kim Ruether and the Regional EMS Foundation, and it turned out that the new school in Royal Oaks, the Roy Bickell Public School, was looking for a sponsor for an AED for the school. Perfect! 
Last night we had a get-together, and I shared my idea with the guys, and we took this great picture.

This is the actual AED that will be placed in the Roy Bickell school, and there will be a plaque placed next to the AED with the guys' names commemorating their efforts and my fortunate story. Not to sound cliché, but this incident has definitely given me some perspective. I encourage everyone to hug their loved ones and also inform them about CPR and AED's and why they are important. Every year in Canada, there are 40,000 cases of cardiac arrest, about one every 12 minutes, and you never know, it could be a family member or friend's life you're saving, or your own getting saved. And so, thanks again to Kevin, Chad, Nick and Rob, and everyone else involved with this incident and saving my life. Steph, Mari and I, and our families are so happy, so grateful and thank God for this blessing each and every day. AEDs and CPR save lives. I am living proof of that. To Donate to Project Brock click the banner below.

Mark Malekoff is the Owner of TriTech Safety and Training, TriTech Energy Services and President of NAKODA Energy Services. [post_title] => AEDs & CPR Save Lives. I Am Living Proof Of That. By Mark Malekoff [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => aeds-cpr-save-lives-living-proof-mark-malekoff [to_ping] => [pinged] => http://www.977rock.ca/kevs-kids/ [post_modified] => 2018-03-14 12:27:07 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-03-14 12:27:07 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=8394 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

How Much Can a “Fall Protection” Negligence Lawsuit Cost You & How Easily Can It Be Avoided Falls are among the most common causes of serious injuries and death in the workplace. In fact, in construction, falls take the top spot for accidents. And a lack of fall protection is the most common fine implemented […]

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How Much Can a "Fall Protection" Negligence Lawsuit Cost You & How Easily Can It Be Avoided

Falls are among the most common causes of serious injuries and death in the workplace. In fact, in construction, falls take the top spot for accidents. And a lack of fall protection is the most common fine implemented by the Ministry of Labour and the Occupational Health and Safety Code.

Now, you might be thinking, “My employees are careful, and we’re safe.” Unless you follow the guidelines and legislation laid out by the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S), you could still be at risk. Not only do falls present dangers to your workers, but negligence can cost you a pretty penny in the long and short term.

The Cost of Fall Protection Negligence

So, how much can fall protection negligence cost you? That really depends on how negligent you’ve been. In fines paid to the Occupational Health and Safety Act, you could owe as much as $40,000 much like a recent roofing company.

According to a blog on the OH&S website, a Ministry of Labour (MOL) inspector reviewed the roofing company because of a site complaint. When he arrived, he observed workers on the roof without fall protection, hard hats, or safety boots. Worse yet, the company’s workers “fled the worksite” during the investigation and the company failed to respond to the inspector’s correspondence.

All of this resulted in:

  •       A $15,000 fine for obstruction
  •       A $25,000 fine for lack of fall protection
  •       A $2,500 fine for lack of hard hats
  •       A $2,500 fine for lack of protective footwear

It’s not just the fines that you have to worry about if you’re negligent with your fall protection system. Back in 2008, a Best Buy employee successfully sued for $1.2 million after his safety belt/harness failed him. And when an employee of J.R. Contracting slipped off a roof, the company ended up owing $75,000, and the worksite supervisor spent 45-days in prison for his part in the accident.

Companies aren’t the only ones at risk. Workers can be fired if they don’t follow proper fall protection procedures. This happened at the Iron Ore Company of Canada, where an employee was on the roof of the warehouse without the proper equipment. After an investigation, it was concluded that the employee’s actions had a potential for significant injury or death, and so the company’s zero tolerance policy ended up with him being terminated from his position.

Protecting Yourself from Fall Protection Negligence

There is good news; you don’t have to worry about getting sued, going to jail, paying fines, or losing your job if your business is properly prepared. While falls are one of the most common causes of injury and death, they’re also one of the easiest to protect against.

Section 11 in the OH&S regulations covers fall protection and states that all elevated surfaces must be strong enough to carry the weight of all workers on it and that a fall protection system must be used when work is being done at a height of greater than three meters (10 feet).

So, what does that mean? What is your responsibility as an employer and employee?

Fall Protection Equipment

A fall protection system and equipment are required for all employees who work at a height of greater than three meters. This system/equipment covers a few different aspects:

Guardrails: For platforms, raised floors, open-sided floors, mezzanines, galleries, balconies, ramps, walkways, or runways at a height of three meters or greater, guardrails must be provided.

These guardrails should follow the requirements outlined in Part 4, which include:

  •         A top rail 102 cm to 112 cm above the work surface,
  •         A protective barrier on all sides open to the air
Fall Restraint Systems: Fall restraint systems can include a variety of equipment. Some of the most common pieces of equipment include ropes, full body harnesses, descent devices, energy absorbers and lanyards, anchors, and more. All components of the fall restraint system must be used in accordance with an applicable CSA of ANSI standard in effect and must be sufficient to support a fall. The system should also consist of compatible and suitable components.

Fall Protection Plan

The second step for your company to avoid litigation based on falls is to create a Fall Protection Plan. This plan should be created by the company and posted in the workplace before work with the risk of falling begins. An effective fall protection plan should have six components as outlined by Canadian OH&S laws.

Those components are as follows:

  1. Fall hazards at the workplace
  2. Fall protection systems to be used
  3. Anchors to be used (must be able to handle at least 3.5 kN [800 lbs] or four times the weight of the worker)
  4. Confirmation of clearance distances below the work area
  5. Procedures to assemble, maintain, inspect, use, and dissemble fall protection systems
  6. Rescue procedures

Fall Protection Training

Finally, the most important thing you can do for your company and your employees is to go through a comprehensive training course, such as the one TriTech Safety & Training offers: Fall Protection (Comprehensive & OSSA Available).

This course covers everything from equipment and techniques to maintaining a proactive approach to ensure safety in high places. After attending the course, all workers should understand falling hazards as well as fall protection procedures and regulations. Students are also taught how to perform equipment inspections and how to evaluate hazards. Upon completion, workers receive their certification from The Fall Protection Group, which lasts for three years.

The reality is that falls don’t have to be a risk to your business. With a few simple techniques, the right equipment, and proper training you can mitigate fall hazards in your place of business and protect yourself from litigation. Call TriTech to find out how we can help.

 
 

TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses.

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Free TriTech Standard First-Aid Digital-Toolbox Guide About this Guide This Standard First Aid  guide has been developed to assist with the unique needs of your small business in regards to occupational health and safety obligations. It will provide you with the practical tools and information necessary to ensure proper first-aid. The toolbox provided is advisory […]

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Free TriTech Standard First-Aid Digital-Toolbox Guide

About this Guide
This Standard First Aid  guide has been developed to assist with the unique needs of your small business in regards to occupational health and safety obligations. It will provide you with the practical tools and information necessary to ensure proper first-aid. The toolbox provided is advisory in nature, informational in content, and is intended to assist employers in providing a safe and healthy workplace.
The Occupational Health and Safety Act requires employers to comply with a set of health and safety standards and regulations. This guide outlines the standard first aid and emergency care that should be provided for injuries while waiting for emergency medical treatment to become available.

In your workplace, the first-aid provider should be someone who is trained in the delivery of initial medical emergency procedures, using a limited amount of equipment to perform these assessments and interventions.

 
 

The focus of this guide is to help you recognize situations where first aid is required and to provide you with the information needed to perform care until emergency medical service (EMS) personnel arrive.

Our Free TriTech Standard First-Aid Digital-Toolbox Guide is just one part of a comprehensive safety and health management program. Its purpose is to present a summary of the basic elements of a standard first-aid program including:
  •  Determining proper scene management and control
  •  Learning how to recognize life-threatening injuries
  •  Designing and implementing a first-aid program that covers such essential intervention activities as:
    1.                     Artificial Respiration (CPR) & Airway Obstructions
    2.                     Electrical Shock
    3.                     Life-Threatening Bleeding
    4.                     Bone and Joint Injuries
    5.                     Head, Neck, and Spinal Injuries
 
 

Chapter 1: Scene Management

The best advice in planning for an emergency is to prepare for the unexpected. Plan for the worst-case scenarios, so that your response plans are sufficient in scope for any situation. To be prepared for emergency situations that require first aid, your business should have already:

  •  Identified the potential hazards that could result in injury or illness,
  •  Determined the likelihood and severity (risk),
  •  Prepared the appropriate first aid facilities and training,
  •  Trained for treatment.
By knowing the hazards as well as the known occurrences of injuries, illnesses, and incidents, your first aid provider can be better prepared for determining if an injury is life threatening and requires immediate emergency aid.

Evaluate the Scene

Once on the scene and before approaching the victim, your first-aid provider should evaluate the potential dangers. Check for:
  •  Electrical Lines,
  •  Hazardous Materials
  •  Vehicular Traffic
  •  Machinery
  •  Fire
  •  Chemical Spills

First-Aid Kit

The following list outlines the minimally acceptable number and type of first-aid supplies that should be on-hand and provided in the first-aid kit. This kit is appropriate for small worksites of two to three employees. If you are a larger corporation or farther away from medical aid, larger first-aid kits should be provided at the work site.
  • The following list outlines the minimally acceptable number and type of first-aid supplies that should be on-hand and provided in the first-aid kit.

    SCHEDULE 3 First Aid Equipment and Supplies

    1. A No. 1 Kit consists of the following: (a) 10 antiseptic cleansing towelettes, individually packaged; (b) 25 sterile adhesive dressings, individually packaged; (c) 10 10 cm x 10 cm sterile gauze pads, individually packaged; (d) 2 10 cm x 10cm sterile compress dressings, with ties, individually packaged; (e) 2 15cm x15 cm sterile compress dressings, with ties, individually packaged; (f) 2 conform gauze bandages — 7.5 cm; (g) 3 cotton triangular bandages; (h) 5 safety pins — assorted sizes; (i) 1 pair of scissors; (j) 1 pair of tweezers; (k) 1 25 mm x 4.5 m of adhesive tape; (l) 1 crepe tension bandage — 75 mm; (m) 1 artificial resuscitation barrier device with a one-way valve; (n) 4 pairs of disposable surgical gloves; (o) 1 first aid instruction manual (condensed); (p) 1 inventory of kit contents; (q) 1 waterproof waste bag.

    SCHEDULE 6 First Aid Requirements  1. Low Hazard (a) 2-10 workers (b) Close worksite (to medical care) - 20 min (c) No. 1 kit (2) Medium hazard (a) 2-9 workers (b) Close worksite - 20 min (c) No. 1 kit (d) 1 Emergency First Aider
 
 

Chapter 2: Recognizing Life-Threatening Injuries

Sudden injuries, some of which may be life-threatening, can occur at work. If you are a first-aid provider, it is your responsibility to care for the injured—if no infirmary, clinic, or hospital is on the scene or near to the workplace—until emergency personnel arrives.

At a minimum, first-aid responders at your workplace should have an Emergency First Aid Certification or its equivalent. If you are a higher-risk workplace, you may be required to have a first aid officer who has completed Standard First Aid.

There are two steps to recognizing life-threatening injuries.

1.) Check the Level of Response

When you reach the victim, first check to see if they are conscious:

  • Call out to the victim and ask if they can open their eyes or hear you.
  • Squeeze the victim’s shoulder and ask them to squeeze your hand.
  • Do not move the victim unless there is a hazard that could cause further injury.

2.) Call for Help—Dial EMS/9-1-1

You should call emergency services immediately.

  • If you cannot call, ask someone with you to call for help while you work with the person.
  • If you are alone, stay with the victim and call emergency services yourself.
  • Be ready to provide emergency personnel with the appropriate information regarding your location and the nature of the injury/incident.
  • Do NOT hang up unless directed.
  • Call using a mobile device if possible so that you can be with victim while talking to dispatch.
Other steps that should be taken when someone is injured include:
  1. Establish a confined space if respiratory protection and specialized training to perform a rescue is required.
  2. Prioritize care when there are several injured by assessing each victim for responsiveness, airway patency (blockage), breathing, circulation, and medical alert tags.
  3. Take victim’s history at the scene, including determining the mechanism of injury.
  4. Perform a logical head-to-toe check for injuries.
  5. Continuously monitor the victim.
 
 

Chapter 3: Artificial Respiration (CPR) & Airway Obstructions

There may be a time when, on the scene at the site of an injury, the person is struggling to breathe. For this reason, all first aid responders are required to complete their CPR Certificate training every 3 years (unless your employer requests you to be certified sooner). Once that training is completed, the following steps should be followed to comply with adult resuscitation and artificial respiration response.

1.) Check the Airway

First, it is important to check the airway of an unresponsive person. To do this:

  • Open the person’s mouth and look for obstructions. Avoid tilting the head back.
  • If an obstruction is found—solid or liquid—roll the person into recovery position and clear the mouth and airway.
  • Check breathing while the person is in recovery position and move to Step 3, to clear the obstruction.
  • If no obstruction, leave the person on their back and move to Step 2.

2.) Check for Breathing

Once you have checked the airway, the next step is to determine how well the person is breathing. To do this:

  •  Open the airway by tilting the head back and lifting the chin. Be careful not to press on the back of the neck.
  •  Look for the person’s chest to rise or fall with breath. 
  •  Listen for breathing by placing your ear near the person’s face.
  •  Feel for moving air by placing your cheek near the person’s nose and mouth.
You should look for normal breathing, which is a minimum of two breaths per 10 seconds.
If they’re NOT breathing or breathing abnormally, call EMS/9-1-1 and start performing CPR (Step 5).
If the person is breathing, move them into recovery position (Step 4).

3.) Clearing the Airway

If the person is conscious, the first thing you should do is ask, “are you choking?” If they are unable to respond, treat as a complete airway obstruction. If they can respond, reassure and encourage the person to cough, and call EMS/9-1-1.
Immediately begin First Aid and call, or have someone nearby call, EMS/9-1-1.  There are three methods that may work: back blows, abdominal thrusts, and chest thrusts.
  •  - Back Blows: Place arm across the chest and have them bend forward. Then proceed to firmly strike 5x between shoulder blades.
  •  - Abdominal Thrusts: Wrap your arms around the waist with your fist above the belly button and quickly squeeze between 4-5x.
  •  - Chest Thrusts: Wrap your arms around person's chest with hand over fist with thumb facing inward. Squeeze the person's chest 4-5x.
  •  - Choking while alone: Dial EMS/9-1-1 and get somewhere that you're easily seen. Attempt to dislodge by quickly leaning over a safe object providing a self-induced abdominal thrust.
If the person choking becomes non-responsive, alert them that EMS is on the way and begin CPR (see step 5)

4.) Recovery Position

Recovery position should be used in two different scenarios: if the person is breathing normally or if the person has an obstruction in their airway that needs to be removed. The steps to placing the person in recovery position are as follows:

Roll the person towards you, to avoid back injury. To do this:

  •  Place the person’s arm—the one closest to you—at a right angle to their body.
  •  Bring the person’s farthest knee up with the foot beside the closest leg's knee.
  •  Place their arm—furthest from you—diagonally across their chest and place their fingers under their neck.
  •  - At the same time, place your forearm under their shoulder, and place your other hand on their knee.
  •  Roll them onto their side towards you and position the top leg at 90 degrees to stabilize them.

While in recovery position, be sure to check the person's vitals every two minutes to ensure they are still breathing while you wait for emergency personnel.

5.) Performing CPR

CPR certification and training must be re-certified every 3-years by the first aid responder. As a reminder, we’ve provided the basic CPR steps below.

  •  Place the person on their back on a firm, flat surface.
  •  Kneel near their upper body so that you are facing them at a 90-degree angle with your knees shoulder-width apart.
  •  Place your hands, one atop the other, on the person’s sternum—the center of their chest over the bone. Push down 5-6cm depth at a rate of about 100-120 compressions per minute—sing to the beat of the Bee Gees Stayin’ Alive.
  •  After 30 compressions, open the person’s mouth—with their head tilted back—and breathe into their mouth. Use a face shield or pocket mask for protection.
  •  Check to see if the chest rose with your breath and repeat for a second breath.
  •  Continue the cycle of 30 compressions and two breaths until emergency medical personnel or an AED arrives.

6.) Defibrillation

If the person is unresponsive to CPR, you may need to use an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) if it is available at your facility. To use, follow the instructions on the device.
  • AED Should always be requested when 9-1-1 is contacted
  • AED should always be connected immediately when available
 
 

Chapter 4: Electrical Shock

Electric shock can be incredibly dangerous in the workplace. It's true danger depends on the type of current, how high the voltage is, and how the current traveled through the victim’s body.

In some cases, electrical shock may leave burns but, in other cases, there may be no visible sign of injury. However, it’s important to remember that electric shock can cause internal damage, cardiac arrest, and other injuries.

There are five steps you should follow when administering first aid to a victim of electric shock.

1.) Evaluate the Danger

Before approaching the victim, you need to determine if the area is still dangerous.

- First, when possible, turn off all power sources before approaching. - For low voltage, turn off the main power - For high voltage electricity, authorities should turn off power. - If you cannot turn off the power, keep 25 meters away from the voltage. - Before approaching, even if power is off, insulate yourself from the ground using books, newspaper, or rubber matting. - Try to remove cables or wires from the victim using a non-conductive object (wood, rolled up newspaper). Do not use a blanket or towel.

2.) Check for a Response

As soon as you can approach the victim, check them for response to see if they are conscious. Call out to ask if they can open their eyes or hear you. Squeeze their shoulder and ask them to squeeze your hand.

DO NOT move the victim unless there is a hazard that has the potential to cause further injury.

3.) Check for Breathing

The first thing to look for is whether or not the person is breathing. You should follow the steps as outlined in the previous chapter Artificial Respiration (CPR) & Airway Obstructions.

      •  - Check the Airway: Open the victim’s mouth and look for obstructions. Avoid tilting the head back. If an obstruction found—solid or liquid—roll the victim into recovery position and clear the mouth an airway. If no obstruction, leave the victim on their back.
      •  - Check for Breathing: Look for the person’s chest to rise or fall with breath.  Listen for breathing by placing your ear near the person’s face. Feel for moving air by placing your cheek near the person’s nose and mouth.
      •  - Perform CPR: CPR certification and training should be repeated every 3-years by the first aid responder.
        • - Place the person on their back on a firm, flat surface.
        • - Kneel near their upper body so that you are facing them at a 90-degree angle with your knees shoulder-width apart.
        • - Place your hands, one atop the other, on the person’s sternum—the center of their chest over the bone.     
        • - Push down 5-6cm depth at a rate of about 100-120 compressions per minute—sing to the beat of the Bee Gees Stayin’ Alive.
        • - After 30 compressions, open the person’s mouth—with their head tilted back—and breathe into their mouth. Use a face shield or pocket mask.
        • - Continue the cycle of 30 compressions and two breaths until emergency medical personnel arrive.

4.) Deal with the Burns

Electrical shock can cause burns to the skin, and in some extreme cases, burns to internal organs. It’s important to provide proper treatment as soon as possible.

      •  - If the person is conscious, immerse any area of burned skin in cool, running water, when possible.
      •  - If burn covers too large of an area to be placed under running water, cover with a cool, wet dressing. This is the same treatment that should be provided to unconscious victims.
      • - Do not use a blanket or towel to cover the burns, as loose fibers can stick to the skin.
      •  - Once burns have been cooled, cover with clean, non-adhesive, non-fluffy dressing.
      •  - Do not remove blisters or apply fats, butter, or ice to the burns.
      • Look for two burns (entry & exit points)

5.) Review Other Injuries

Other injuries can occur with electrical shock including:

      •  - Confusion
      •  - Heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias)
      •  - Cardiac arrest
      •  - Muscle pain and contractions
      •  - Seizures
      •  - Loss of consciousness
In these cases, ensure the victim has padding under the head and that their breathing is unrestricted. And even if the victim does not show any signs of injury, call emergency personnel, as some injuries can be internal.
 
 

Chapter 5: Life-Threatening Bleeding

Bleeding is a common injury that occurs on worksites, from small cuts to life-threatening injuries. No matter the case, you should be prepared to handle bleeding wounds by following these five steps.

 

1.) Use Protection

As always, before treating the person, you should protect yourself. Safety always comes first.

      •  - Check for hazards before approaching the victim.
      •  - Wear gloves as a protective barrier. If you do not have gloves, do not contact the person directly.
      •  - If blood is gushing or squirting, wear a facemask to protect your nose and mouth from contact.

2.) Identify and Examine

Next, it’s important to determine the severity of the injury and its cause.

      •  - If possible, ask the person to sit down. Use a calm, reassuring voice and get their consent to commence treatment.
      •  - Expose the wound by removing any clothing that prevents examination.
      •  - Check for foreign objects in the wound.
The goal after this assessment is to determine how severe the injury is. If it appears to be life-threatening, call EMS/9-1-1.

3.) Use Direct Pressure

When profuse bleeding happens, you need to act fast to stop it.

      •  - Immobilize the area to reduce bleeding.
      •  - Using your gloved hands, apply direct pressure to the area of the wound.
      •  - If there is a foreign object in the wound - Do Not Remove it! Apply pressure around the object and call EMS/9-1-1.
      •  - If the person can help, ask them to also apply pressure to the wound.
Remember, if the bleeding is severe, there is a good chance that the person could go into shock or lose consciousness. Be prepared.

4.) Don NOT remove pressure until EMS arrives

This is a pivotal part that needs to be understood. Attempting to dress wound could be fatal.

      •  - If blood continues to seep through the bandage, apply another pad and bandage on top of the original. DO NOT remove the original bandage. Apply pressure and wait for the ambulance to arrive.

5.) Clean Up

In the end, whenever you are dealing with blood, you need to be careful of exposure no matter how many precautions you take. That’s why clean up is so important.

      • Wash your hands and any other skin that could have possibly come into contact with the wound in warm, soapy water.
      • If blood comes into contact with your open skin, eyes, or mouth, wash with warm, soapy water and seek immediate medical assistance.
      • Dispose of all contaminated gloves, bandages, and other supplies in a biological hazard container.
      • If a large area of the property is affected, contact a professional restoration company for guidance.
 
 

Chapter 6: Bone & Joint Injuries

Bone and joint injuries are common in the workplace. The key is understanding what each type of injury is and how to respond.

In this chapter, we’ll describe how to recognize bone, muscle, and joint injuries. Describe care for a person with a bone, muscle, or joint injury and list immobilization techniques, including the application of a tube sling, regular sling, and splints.
 

1.) Understanding Bone & Joint Injuries

Bone and joint injuries aren’t as simple as other types of injuries, and that’s because it can be difficult to tell the difference between the types of injuries. There are four main types:

      • Fracture:
      • A fracture is a break or crack in a bone that can be caused by an accident, fall, or blow. Symptoms of this type of injury include a snapping sound, bone protruding from the skin, detectable deformity of the bone, abnormal bone movement, pain and tenderness, grating sensation during movement, swelling, and discoloration.
      • Sprain:
      • A sprain typically refers to stretched or torn tendons, ligaments, and blood vessels around a joint. Symptoms of this type of injury include pain, tenderness, swelling, and discoloration of the joint area.
      • Strain:
      • Muscle strain refers to stretched or torn muscle and can be caused by too much physical effort or improper posture during activity. Symptoms of this type of injury include pain, stiffness, and possible swelling.
      • Dislocation:
      • This is a joint injury where the bone has popped out of its socket, and it may be accompanied by a fracture, strain, or sprain.
In some cases, it is not possible to tell the difference between a fracture, sprain, or strain until an x-ray has been performed. If you cannot tell the difference, treat the injury as a fracture and dial EMA/9-1-1.

2.) Treating a Fracture, Sprain, Strain, or Dislocation

There are typically five steps to treating any type of bone or joint injury.

      •  - If you suspect a fracture (break), Call EMS/9-1-1 if:
      •  - Thighs or pelvis are affected
      •  - Area below is numb. pale, blue, or cold
      •  - Bone is protruding from skin
      •  - You cannot safely move person
      • Describe the injury to EMS and do not attempt to transport the victim, particularly if you suspect a head, back, or neck injury or if there is a visible deformity in the bone and any movement causes the victim more pain.
      •  - If bleeding is present, control any bleeding by applying direct pressure. DO NOT elevate the affected area. If the bone is protruding, cover with a clean cloth after bleeding has been controlled.
      •  - Immobilize and support the affected bone in the position it was found. If a bone is protruding, do not try to push it back into the body. Also, do not let the victim move or use the affected area (do not place ice directly on the skin). For more information about splints, move to Step 4.
      •  - Apply cold to the area, using an ice pack or bag of ice cubes in a clean piece of cloth. Apply it to the injured area for 20 mins every hour.
      •  - Observe the victim for shock and do NOT supply the victim with anything to eat or drink.

3.) Using the “RICE” Treatment

For strains and sprains, in particular, you should follow the RICE treatment plan.

      • R – Rest:
      • Have the person lie down and rest their injury. Tell them not to move or put any pressure on the injury.
      • I – Immobilize:
      • Keep the injured area as still as possible. Only splint the injured area if necessary to safely move the person.
      • C – Cool:
      • Ice the injured area for 20 minutes every hour.
      • E – Elevation:
      • Elevate the injured area above the level of the person’s heart as long as this does not increase pain.. To do this, have them lie down and then prop their injured arm or leg above their chest in a comfortable support position.

4.) Splints

The purpose of a splint is to keep an injured body part immobilized until help can arrive. Splints should be used sparingly, and only in cases where emergency personnel will take a while to arrive or the person should be moved for safety reasons. The person should always be splinted in the position they are found, and the injured body part should never be moved or realigned.

There are three types of splints:

      • Anatomical:
      • This simple splint requires the person to use a non-injured body part to immobilize an injured body part. For example, splinting a broken left leg with the right leg.
      • Soft:
      • This type of splint uses a thick sweater, towel, or blanket to wrap and immobilize the injury.
      • Rigid:
      • This type of splint uses a rigid object, such as a piece of wood, to immobilize.
Splints can be designed using a variety of objects on hand. They can be improvised using boards, poles, sticks, rolled newspapers, and even cardboard.
 
 

Chapter 7: Head and Spinal Injuries

Any trauma to the head or spine is considered a serious injury.  It can lead to permanent mental or physical impairment, disability, and even death. In this chapter, we’ll describe situations that should make you suspect a head, neck, or spinal injury, and demonstrate care.

1.) Identifying a Head or Spinal Injury

You don’t have to be hit on the head directly to experience a head injury. Impacts elsewhere on the body can be enough to jar the brain. Symptoms and signs that you should look for in the case of a head injury include:

      •  - Confusion, depression, dizziness, or balance issues
      •  - Blurred or double vision
      •  - Headache and/or nausea
      •  - Sluggish feeling or trouble concentrating
      •  - Memory loss
      •  - Impaired senses: slurred speech, loss of coordination
      •  - Bleeding on the head area: nose, mouth, or ears.
      •  - Facial bruising
      •  - Low breathing rate
      •  - Unconsciousness

Spinal injuries can be very serious and made worse if proper treatment is not used. Symptoms and signs of a spinal injury include:

      •  - Pain at the site of impact or just below it
      •  - Loss of feeling in the spine or legs
      •  - Tingling or a “pins and needles” feeling in the hands and/or feet
      •  - Reduced movement below the site of injury
      •  - Weakness or difficulty walking, paralysis
      •  - Unconsciousness

2.) First Aid for Head Injuries

Head injuries should be treated carefully, and EMS/9-1-1 should be called immediately in any situation where head trauma is expected.

      • Monitor Person:
      • The first priority in a head injury is to ensure that the person is breathing on their own and that their pulse is steady. Follow DRABC: Danger, Response, Airway, Breathing, and Circulation.
      • Support the Head and Neck:
      • Do NOT move the neck or head in case of additional spinal injury. If the person is unresponsive or unable to support their own head, manually support it in the position found.
      • Control Bleeding:
      • In the case of open wounds on the head, place a sterile pad over any area of bleeding. If a skull fracture is suspected, do NOT apply pressure. If bleeding continues, apply additional pads around the area until the bleeding stops.
        •  - If bleeding or fluid is present in the ears, use a pad to prevent infection but allow the fluids to drain.
      • Immobilize Person: While waiting for emergency personnel, keep the person immobilized. 

 First Aid for Spinal Injuries

Spinal injuries are almost always very serious in nature and should be treated with extreme care. EMS/9-1-1 should be called immediately if a spinal injury is suspected and the person should not be moved unless there is an immediate danger.Immobilize Person: Do NOT move the person unless he or she is in immediate danger. If they are conscious, keep them calm and ask where and how it hurts. Ask the person to move as little as possible.
      • Monitor Person:
      • Similar to a head injury, the person should be monitored for breathing. For conscious person's, continually monitor their airway, breathing, and circulation until help arrives. If the person is unconscious be prepared to provide CPR.
      • Support Head and Neck:
      • The first priority in a spinal injury is to protect the head and neck. If the person is alert, ask them to remain as still as possible. If the person is unresponsive or unable to support his or her own head, manually support it in the position found.
      • Calm the Person:
      • Keep the person calm by reassuring them and assessing them for other injuries.
 
 

Chapter 8: First Aid Training Courses

TriTech offers two basic first aid training courses for personnel. The courses are:

1.) Emergency First Aid

This is a basic one-day course providing an overview of first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills for the workplace and home. The course includes the latest first aid and CPR guidelines while meeting OHS regulations for Basic First Aid.

      •  - 6.5 – 8 hours (7-9 hours in Ontario)
      •  - Red Cross First Aid Instructor
      •  - 3-year certification in Emergency First Aid, CPR level A, C, or HCP and AED

Content includes:

      •  - Preparing to respond
      •  - The EMS system
      •  - Check, Call, Care
      •  - Airway emergencies
      •  - Breathing and circulation emergencies
      •  - First air for respiratory and cardiac arrest
      •  - Wound care

2.) Standard First Aid & CPR

This comprehensive two-day course offers first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills for those who need training due to work requirements. This course also provides more knowledge to respond to emergencies at home. It meets federal and a variety of provincial/territorial regulations for Standard First Aid and CPR. It includes the latest first aid and CPR guidelines.

      •  - 14-16 hours
      •  - Red Cross First Aid Instructor
      •  - 3-year certification in Emergency First Aid, CPR level A, C, or HCP and AED
      •  - 6-9 hours; includes CPR Level A, C, or HCP and AED; adheres to local legislation

Content includes:

      •  - Preparing to respond
      •  - The EMS system
      •  - Check, Call, Care
      •  - Airway emergencies
      •  - Breathing and circulation emergencies
      •  - First air for respiratory and cardiac arrest
      •  - Wound care
      •  - Head and spine injuries
      •  - Bone, muscle, and joint injuries
      •  - Sudden medical emergencies
      •  - Environmental emergencies
      •  - Poisons
To set up a training course for your employees, call TriTech Safety & Training Inc. at (780) 402-3312 or visit us at https://tritechsafety.ca/

Download the Free TriTech First Aid eBook

TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses. [post_title] => Free Standard First Aid Digital-Toolbox [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => free-standard-first-aid-digital-toolbox [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-03-14 12:42:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-03-14 12:42:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7691 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Health and Safety Tips Your Company Would Benefit to Learn From This Year As an employer, there are many workplace issues that fall on your shoulders, including the health and safety of your employees. It’s your legal duty to ensure that the environment and culture you provide protects the mental and physical health of your […]

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Health and Safety Tips Your Company Would Benefit to Learn From This Year

As an employer, there are many workplace issues that fall on your shoulders, including the health and safety of your employees. It’s your legal duty to ensure that the environment and culture you provide protects the mental and physical health of your employees at all times. It’s a daunting task especially if you consider that 232,629 Canadian employees reported an injury and lost-time claim in 2015, according to the Association of Workers’ Compensation Boards of Canada.

But it’s not just injuries that you’re responsible for. Results from a 2014 Angus Reid survey on sexual harassment in Canada revealed that 3 in 10 Canadians said that they had been sexually harassed at work. And In any given year, one in five people in Canada experience a mental health problem or illness, with a cost to the economy of more than $50 billion, according to the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC). 

So, what can you do to ensure the health and safety of your employees and what are you actually responsible for?

Employer Responsibility

According to the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS), “It is the legal duty of an employer to protect the mental and physical health of employees, and this includes protection from harassment and violence. Many provincial occupational health and safety acts now include harm to psychological well-being in the definition of harassment.”

And there is a logical reason behind this. The human and financial cost of workplace harassment and violence are great. Employees who suffer from harassment or violence are not only physically and psychologically affected, but they’ll also impact your organization with decreased productivity, low morale, increased absenteeism, higher health care costs, and potential legal expenses.

As for mental health, “No workplace is immune from mental health challenges, and now no workplace is without the resources to address them,” says Louise Bradley, MHCC President, and CEO. “The Standard gives every employer the opportunity to examine their mental wellness efforts and the tools they need to improve.”

And for those organizations that decide to make mental health a priority, there’s a huge benefit. During an MHCC Case Study Research Project, which tracked 40 Canadian organizations in various industries and sectors as they successfully implemented the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace, there was a remarkable improvement in mental health.

  • 66% enhanced awareness of mental health among employees
  • Participating organizations achieved on average 72% compliance with the five elements (commitment and policy, planning, implementation, evaluation and corrective action, management review) in the Standard, a remarkable improvement from 55% compliance at the baseline stage.

As for physical safety, according to CCOHS an employer must:

- Establish and maintain a health and safety committee, or encourage their workers to select at least one health and safety representative - Take every reasonable precaution to ensure the workplace is safe - Train employees about any potential hazards and how to safely use, handle, store, and dispose of hazardous substances and how to handle emergencies - Supply personal protective equipment and ensure workers know how to handle all equipment safely and properly- - Immediately report all critical injuries to the OH&S - Appoint a competent supervisor who sets the standard for performance and ensures safe working conditions.

Health and Safety Tips

With your employer responsibilities in mind, below are a few health and safety tips for your company.

Conduct Inspections / Risk Assessment

You might be surprised to discover where hazards are hiding in your company. Hazards can exist under desks, on the plant floor, in the air, and anywhere your employees work. Regularly inspecting your workplace for hazards is essential for your worker health and safety.

Depending on the high hazard or high risk of your organization, you need to schedule a detailed inspection that looks for biological (viruses and mold), chemical (cleaners, adhesives, paints), ergonomic (repetitive and forceful movements, computer stations), Safety (machine guards), and physical hazards (noise, heat, and cold).

When conducting an inspection, follow these Look up, down, around, and inside. Be methodical and thorough.

- Draw attention to any immediate danger - Shut down and lock out any hazardous items that cannot be brought to a safe operating standard immediately - Describe each hazard and its exact location - Ask questions but do interrupt work activities - Consider the static and dynamic conditions of each item you inspect - Discuss potential hazards and dangers as a group - Photograph dangerous situations
Ask the operator to demonstrate equipment and check for their knowledge on dangers that may be present during operation.

Once the inspection is completed, provide your health and safety committee with the report and implement corrective action.

Develop Safe Workplace Facilities

Housekeeping is crucial for a safe and healthy workplace environment. Whether you’re in a traditional office or industrial workplace, including factory, warehouse, or manufacturing plant there are many challenges to keeping your employees protected. In general, you should implement the following tips:

Prevent slips, trips, and falls OSHA’s Walking-Working Surfaces Standard 1910.22(a) explains that all workplaces should be “kept clean and orderly and in a sanitary condition.” 
The Canadian Center for Occupational Health and Safety recommends:
- Reporting and cleaning spills and leaks - Keeping aisles and exits clear - Installing mirrors and warning signs in blind spots - Replacing worn, ripped, or damaged flooring - Installing anti-slip flooring in dangerous areas - Using drip pans and guards

Eliminate fire hazards

According to OSHA’s Hazardous Materials Standard (1910.106), employees are responsible for keeping unnecessary combustible materials from accumulating, and waste should be disposed of daily. Consider taking TriTech’s Detection & Control of Flammable Substances course.
Fire safety precautions include:
- Keeping only a limited number of combustible materials in the work area - Storing quick-burning, flammable materials in safe locations - Avoiding clothes contamination - Keeping passageways and fire doors free of obstructions - Keep materials at least 18 inches away from sprinklers and fire extinguishers - Report and fix electrical hazards
Control dust: Dust accumulation of .8 millimeters that covers at least 5% of a room’s surface poses an explosion hazard. It can also affect equipment’s length of life and quality as well as air quality for your employees. Dust should be removed through vacuuming, sweeping, water wash-down, and other methods. Prevent falling objects: Place heavy objects on lower shelves, and keep equipment away from edges. Stack boxes and materials straight and use a toe board, toe rail, or net to prevent objects from falling. OSHA’s Materials Handling, Storage, Use, and Disposal Standard (1926.250) states that storage areas should not present hazards for tripping, fire, explosion, pests, or falls. Provide and wear personal protective equipment and tools: Basic PPE equipment such as closed-toe shoes, safety glasses, gloves, hats, glasses, and respirators should be used as required by the environment. Create written rules: As an employer, you must display a health and safety law poster where employees can easily access and read it. You should also have a healthy and safety policy that clearly states who does what within your business, when, and how.

Create a Plan for Mental Health, Harassment, and Violence in the Workplace

When workplace harassment and violence is not defined, it can go unnoticed and unreported. The key is to have a plan in place that helps you recognize and report harassment and violence.

Violence: Workplace violence can take many forms. It can include physical violence such as hitting, shoving, kicking, and threatening behavior. It can also be in the form of arguments, property damage, theft, psychological trauma, written threats, rumors, pranks, insults, and condescending language. Harassment: Workplace harassment is a form of discrimination. It involved unwanted physical and verbal behavior. It typically involved unwelcome remarks based on race, ethnic origin, color, religion, sexual orientation, age, marital and family status, disability, etc. Sexual harassment is any conduct, comment, gesture or contact that is sexual in nature and is likely to cause offense or humiliation.
To protect your organization, you should set up a no-tolerance policy. Managers must not tolerate any violent behavior including aggression, harassment, or threats of violence. There should be a written policy that describes how employees can report experiences with harassment and violence. You should also come up with a prevention program that includes reporting and investigating, emergency response planning, victim assistance, incident follow-up, and training and education.

TriTech offers a vast array of safety courses at their training facility, or private training sessions can be held at your location. Contact us for further details on protecting the safety and health of your employees.

TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses.

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Top 10 OSHA Violations

Top 10 OSHA Violations Each year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a list of the ten most frequently cited and fined violations for the fiscal year. This list of safety and health citations is compiled from nearly 32,000 workplace inspections, and the list rarely changes. Year after year, OSHA runs into the same […]

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Top 10 OSHA Violations

Each year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a list of the ten most frequently cited and fined violations for the fiscal year. This list of safety and health citations is compiled from nearly 32,000 workplace inspections, and the list rarely changes.

Year after year, OSHA runs into the same violations during their inspections of on-the-job hazards. This is important to note considering that many of these violations could result in fatality or severe injury. In fact, more than 4,500 workers are killed on the job each year, and around three million are injured. But these citations are easily preventable with a little bit of knowledge, training, and equipment.

For 2016, the following list of ten citations covers those most frequently viewed by OSHA inspectors.

 

Fall Protection (1926.501)

In 2016, there were 6,906 total Fall Protection violations. The outlines covered by OSHA include which systems are appropriate for a given situation, the proper construction, and installation of safety systems, and the proper supervision of employees to prevent falls. In particular, the outline is designed to protect employees who work above six feet in height and are dealing with an unprotected edge.

The most common violations were:

- Residential construction - Unprotected sides/edges - Roofing work on low-slope roofs - Steep roofs - Holes and skylights

Hazard Communication (1910.1200)

Hazard Communication had a total of 5,665 violations in 2016. These violations were due to how employers communicated chemical hazards—chemicals produced and imported into the workplace—to their workers.

The most common citations included:

- Implementation of a Hazcom Program - Training - Requirements to maintain - Requirements to develop - Explanation of label on shipping containers

Scaffolds (1926.451)

There were 3,900 Scaffolding citations handed out in 2016. For scaffolding, OSHA outlines general safety requirements that discuss such topics as the design of the scaffold by a qualified person and construction in accordance with that design. Under scaffolding, there is also a requirement to protect workers from falls and falling objects on or near scaffolding.

Top citations included:

- Fall protection on scaffolds more than 10 feet above a lower level - Cross braces should not be used as means of access for scaffolds lower than two feet - Fully planked or decked scaffold levels - Fall arrest and guardrail systems - Guardrail systems installed on open ends and sides of platforms.

Respiratory Protection (1910.134)

With a total of 3,573 violations in 2016, Respiratory Protection provides standards for employers in establishing and maintaining a respiratory program. The requirements include information for worksite-specific procedures, selection of respirators, employee training, fit testing, medical evaluation, respirator use, and respirator cleaning, repair, and maintenance.

The most common citations for the year were:

- Medical evaluation of respiration protection - Using respiratory protection - Fit testing for respirators - Establish respiratory program - Respiratory hazards identified and evaluated - Lockout/Tagout

Lockout/Tagout standards received 3,406 violations last year. The standards outline the minimum performance requirements for hazardous energy while servicing or maintaining machines and equipment.

The most common violations included:

- General procedures - An energy control program - Periodic employer inspection - Training

Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178)

There were 2,855 violations for Powered Industrial Trucks in 2016. The OSHA standards outline the design, maintenance, and operation of powered industrial trucks, which include forklifts and hand trucks.

The most common citations were:

- Safe operation - Operator performance evaluation every three years - Certification - Truck repair and maintenance - Instruction, practical training, and evaluation of operator’s performance

Ladders (1926.1053)

There were 2,625 violations for the operation and use of Ladders. 

The most common violations included:

- Portable ladder access - Appropriate ladder use - Not using the top step of a stepladder - Structural defects - Carrying an object of load that could cause imbalance or falling.

Machine Guarding (1910.212)

With 2,448 violations, Machine Guarding was another top OSHA violation. The standards cover machinery guarding to protect operators and employees from hazards. This includes outlines regarding the point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips, and sparks.

The top citations included:

- Lack of machine guarding provided to protect employees - Point of operation - Anchoring fixed machinery - General requirements - Exposure of blades when fan is less than 7 feet above the ground

Electrical Wiring (1910.305)

Electrical Wiring had a total of 1,937 violations in 2016. The standards outlined by OSHA cover the grounding of electrical equipment, wiring, and insulation. It also covered temporary wiring and splicing.

Top violations were:

- Substitute for fixed wiring of a structure - Effectively closing openings - Strain relief of flexible cords and cable - Covers and canopies - Protection of conductors from abrasion and openings

Electrical: General Requirements (1910.303)

Finally, with 1,704 violations, Electrical: General Requirements was the last OSHA violation to make the top ten list. The standards include general safety and design of electrical systems.

Top violations included:

- Installation and use - Guarding of live parts - Workspace requirements - Space around electrical equipment - Services, feeders, and branch circuits

If you’re worried that your business is at risk of any of the above OSHA violations, contact TriTech today. We do our best to accommodate last minute training requests and have staff on call 24-hours a day for help. Using either our offsite, corporate, and scheduled training courses you should be able to find the solution that works best for your business. Contact us today!

TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_title] => Top 10 OSHA Violations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => top-10-osha-violations [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-03-14 12:45:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-03-14 12:45:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7319 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
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