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Top 10 OSHA Violations Each year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a list of the ten most frequently cited and fined violations for the fiscal year. This list of safety and health citations is compiled from nearly 32,000 workplace inspections, and the list rarely changes. Year after year, OSHA runs into the same […]

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Top 10 OSHA Violations

Each year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration releases a list of the ten most frequently cited and fined violations for the fiscal year. This list of safety and health citations is compiled from nearly 32,000 workplace inspections, and the list rarely changes.

Year after year, OSHA runs into the same violations during their inspections of on-the-job hazards. This is important to note considering that many of these violations could result in fatality or severe injury. In fact, more than 4,500 workers are killed on the job each year, and around three million are injured. But these citations are easily preventable with a little bit of knowledge, training, and equipment.

For 2016, the following list of ten citations covers those most frequently viewed by OSHA inspectors.

Fall Protection (1926.501)

In 2016, there were 6,906 total Fall Protection violations. The outlines covered by OSHA include which systems are appropriate for a given situation, the proper construction, and installation of safety systems, and the proper supervision of employees to prevent falls. In particular, the outline is designed to protect employees who work above six feet in height and are dealing with an unprotected edge.

The most common violations were:

- Residential construction - Unprotected sides/edges - Roofing work on low-slope roofs - Steep roofs - Holes and skylights

Hazard Communication (1910.1200)

Hazard Communication had a total of 5,665 violations in 2016. These violations were due to how employers communicated chemical hazards—chemicals produced and imported into the workplace—to their workers.

The most common citations included:

- Implementation of a Hazcom Program - Training - Requirements to maintain - Requirements to develop - Explanation of label on shipping containers

Scaffolds (1926.451)

There were 3,900 Scaffolding citations handed out in 2016. For scaffolding, OSHA outlines general safety requirements that discuss such topics as the design of the scaffold by a qualified person and construction in accordance with that design. Under scaffolding, there is also a requirement to protect workers from falls and falling objects on or near scaffolding.

Top citations included:

- Fall protection on scaffolds more than 10 feet above a lower level - Cross braces should not be used as means of access for scaffolds lower than two feet - Fully planked or decked scaffold levels - Fall arrest and guardrail systems - Guardrail systems installed on open ends and sides of platforms.

Respiratory Protection (1910.134)

With a total of 3,573 violations in 2016, Respiratory Protection provides standards for employers in establishing and maintaining a respiratory program. The requirements include information for worksite-specific procedures, selection of respirators, employee training, fit testing, medical evaluation, respirator use, and respirator cleaning, repair, and maintenance.

The most common citations for the year were:

- Medical evaluation of respiration protection - Using respiratory protection - Fit testing for respirators - Establish respiratory program - Respiratory hazards identified and evaluated - Lockout/Tagout

Lockout/Tagout standards received 3,406 violations last year. The standards outline the minimum performance requirements for hazardous energy while servicing or maintaining machines and equipment.

The most common violations included:

- General procedures - An energy control program - Periodic employer inspection - Training

Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178)

There were 2,855 violations for Powered Industrial Trucks in 2016. The OSHA standards outline the design, maintenance, and operation of powered industrial trucks, which include forklifts and hand trucks.

The most common citations were:

- Safe operation - Operator performance evaluation every three years - Certification - Truck repair and maintenance - Instruction, practical training, and evaluation of operator’s performance

Ladders (1926.1053)

There were 2,625 violations for the operation and use of Ladders. 

The most common violations included:

- Portable ladder access - Appropriate ladder use - Not using the top step of a stepladder - Structural defects - Carrying an object of load that could cause imbalance or falling.

Machine Guarding (1910.212)

With 2,448 violations, Machine Guarding was another top OSHA violation. The standards cover machinery guarding to protect operators and employees from hazards. This includes outlines regarding the point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips, and sparks.

The top citations included:

- Lack of machine guarding provided to protect employees - Point of operation - Anchoring fixed machinery - General requirements - Exposure of blades when fan is less than 7 feet above the ground

Electrical Wiring (1910.305)

Electrical Wiring had a total of 1,937 violations in 2016. The standards outlined by OSHA cover the grounding of electrical equipment, wiring, and insulation. It also covered temporary wiring and splicing.

Top violations were:

- Substitute for fixed wiring of a structure - Effectively closing openings - Strain relief of flexible cords and cable - Covers and canopies - Protection of conductors from abrasion and openings

Electrical: General Requirements (1910.303)

Finally, with 1,704 violations, Electrical: General Requirements was the last OSHA violation to make the top ten list. The standards include general safety and design of electrical systems.

Top violations included:

- Installation and use - Guarding of live parts - Workspace requirements - Space around electrical equipment - Services, feeders, and branch circuits

If you’re worried that your business is at risk of any of the above OSHA violations, contact TriTech today. We do our best to accommodate last minute training requests and have staff on call 24-hours a day for help. Using either our offsite, corporate, and scheduled training courses you should be able to find the solution that works best for your business. Contact us today!

TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_title] => Top 10 OSHA Violations [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => top-10-osha-violations [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-28 23:20:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-28 23:20:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7319 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

The Top Occupational Health & Safety Training Courses That Pack The Most Value Everyone who has ever run a business knows that it’s absolutely essential to control costs. However, anyone who’s worked on a construction site also knows that safety training isn’t just a line item on a budget — it’s a matter of life […]

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The Top Occupational Health & Safety Training Courses That Pack The Most Value

Everyone who has ever run a business knows that it’s absolutely essential to control costs. However, anyone who’s worked on a construction site also knows that safety training isn’t just a line item on a budget -- it’s a matter of life and death.

Beyond the human costs, the impact on the bottom line can mean the difference between business success and failure. Between lawsuits, fines, administrative costs, increases in insurance premiums, and other expenses, the average cost of a construction accident is $27,000. That can sometimes spell the difference between a project that’s profitable and one that closes at a loss. With that said, not all safety awareness courses are created equal. While all are valuable, some have a more immediate impact than others. So let’s take a look at the types of workplace safety training courses that pack the biggest punch as well as why they’re so important.

Worker occupational safety awareness

The best safety training courses start with Awareness. One reason is that such training is required by law. While the details may vary by locale, most jurisdictions require Basic Awareness training. In addition to basic workplace safety and awareness, courses should introduce workers to the Occupational Health and Safety Act with a focus on worker rights and responsibilities. It’s a mistake to assume that experienced employees automatically follow safety best practices. Aside from employees in occupations that are known to be high-risk, most people don’t think about safety very much during their day-to-day routines. Keeping safety top-of-mind, and making it a business-as-usual process, can reduce the risk of accidents and injuries.

Manager/supervisor occupational safety awareness

While general safety awareness is just as important for managers and supervisors as for front-line workers, those in a supervisory role have additional responsibilities, such as maintaining a safe workplace and making sure employees follow the proper procedures. In addition to regulatory details on things like posting safety information and reporting accidents, the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety recommends that supervisory training includes topics like:
  • Safety principles and risk management
  • Legislation
  • Rights and responsibilities of managers, supervisors, and workers
  • Hazard recognition and control measures
  • Fire prevention and emergency preparedness
  • Hazards and control measures for chemical, physical, and biological hazards
  • Ergonomics — practices to prevent musculoskeletal disorders
  • Workplace inspection and accident investigation
  • Developing and implementing effective workplace programs
Supervisory training is critical because many new supervisors don’t fully understand their responsibilities or their own liability when it comes to workplace safety.

Fall protection

Falls are amongst the most common cause of death and injury in the construction industry. In fact, more than 40,000 Canadian workers per year are injured due to falls. In the United States, 364 out of 930 deaths in the construction industry during 2015 resulted from falls. In monetary terms, such falls cost businesses somewhere between $50,000 and $100,00 apiece. Reducing the number of falls benefits businesses in terms of both human lives and financial well-being. Courses on fall prevention should cover both the regulatory details. (for instance, the minimum height at which protective equipment is required) as well as practical guides for preventing and/or arresting falls (procedures, equipment, etc.).

Confined spaces

Confined spaces () also merit focused training. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) reports that an average of 92 fatalities per year occurs due to confined space accidents. One reason confined spaces can be so dangerous is the wide variety of hazards inherent in working in such a space -- many of which aren’t obvious to untrained workers.

Some of the more common risks include:

  • Air quality and chemical exposure
  • Collapse and entrapment
  • Temperature extremes
  • Working in close proximity to moving equipment
  • Fire
In addition, many workers injured in confined spaces are unable to help themselves and must, therefore, be rescued which exposes additional employees to danger. In fact, 60% of reported confined space fatalities occur among would-be rescuers. So training is critical for both those who work in confined spaces and those whose job it is to rescue them.

Topics that should be covered in a confined space course include:

  • Definition of a confined space
  • Regulatory requirements (such as confined space warning posters)
  • Common risks
  • Accident prevention (both procedures and personal protective equipment)
Every business has to weigh expenses vs. profit. When it comes to safety training, however, it’s not just an expense. The return on the courses described here can be easily quantified and will well exceed the related costs. TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up-to-date with the essential and important industry practices for preventing avoidable accidents. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_title] => The Top Occupational Health & Safety Training Courses That Pack The Most Value [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-top-occupational-health-safety-training-courses-that-pack-the-most-value [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ http://www.ohscanada.com/overtime/people-are-falling-statistics-are-not/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 14:47:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 14:47:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7288 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

For the first 10 Safety Points, read last week’s article Here. 11. Hazardous Materials Material Safety Data Sheets should be provided for all hazardous materials. Containers should be clearly labeled and properly stored. When using hazardous materials, employees should have and use the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment including gloves, hard hats, hearing and eye protection, […]

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For the first 10 Safety Points, read last week's article Here.

11. Hazardous Materials

Material Safety Data Sheets should be provided for all hazardous materials. Containers should be clearly labeled and properly stored. When using hazardous materials, employees should have and use the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment including gloves, hard hats, hearing and eye protection, safety harnesses, protective clothing, respirators, and CSA approved footwear. After use, hazardous materials should be disposed of properly.

12. Emergency Response Plan

According to OHS Section 4.13, an Emergency Response Plan must be written, and affected workers must be consulted in the development of the plan. The plan should include: - Identification of potential emergencies - Procedures for dealing with emergencies - Identification of, location of, and operational procedures for emergency equipment - Emergency response training - Location and use of emergency facilities - Fire protection requirements - Alarm and emergency communication requirements - First aid services - Procedures for rescue and evacuation - Designated rescue and evacuation workers

13. Sanitation

Washrooms and food preparation areas should be kept clean with measures in place to prevent the spread of disease. All occupational environment requirements are outlined in OHS Regulations 4.84 - 4.87. The following services must also be provided adequately depending on your business: - Toilets - Showers - Potable water - Clothing storage - Change rooms - Field accommodations - Lunchrooms

14. Ventilation

According to Sections 5.61 to 5.71, a local exhaust ventilation system must be designed so that under normal work procedures a worker's breathing zone is not located between the source of contamination and the exhaust uptake. Make sure that the ventilation system is not obstructed by material or equipment placed in front of the ventilation openings. If an operation or work process produces a combustible or flammable air contaminant in concentrations that may present a risk of fire or explosion, the employer must provide a separate exhaust ventilation system for the operation or work process.

15. Fall Prevention

Section 11 covers fall protection and states that all elevated surfaces must be strong enough to carry the weight of all workers on it. These areas must also be covered on the sides with appropriate railings or features to minimize the risk of falls. When risk is involved, workers must be provided with anchors or fall restraint systems. When a fall restraint system is used to block a fall, it must be tested before it is used again.

16. Personal Protective Equipment

Depending on your hazards assessment, you must provide all workers with Personal Protective Equipment including headgear, hearing protection, gloves, respiratory masks, eye protection, jackets, or aprons. In environments where workers are exposed to cold, water-resistant and appropriately insulated clothing must be worn. If workers are exposed to deep water, life jackets must be equipped. For a list of complete PPE see Section 8 of the OHS regulations.

17. Confined Spaces

If your workplace has confined spaces, which may be hazardous due to lack of oxygen, the presence of toxic gas, or harm due to entrapment, adequate protection and training must be supplied based on part 9 of the OHS regulations. This means that you must study all possible risks associated with a confined space and advise workers of the same. Confined spaces should also be securely locked and labeled when not in use.

18. Ergonomic Safety

OHS Regulations 4.46 – 4.53 require training and means for employees to maintain ergonomic safety. You should review your business for: - Jobs that require eyestrain or glare - Tasks that require prolonged raising of arms - Tasks that put the neck and shoulders in awkward positions - Work that requires twisting or bending over - Hand tools with soft grips, non-slip surfaces, comfortably curved shapes, and      appropriate lengths - Power tool assistance utilized where possible to reduce employee strain

19. Safe Work Practices

Machine guards should be in use and workers should know how to use machinery and the required personal protective equipment. All new employees should receive adequate training in safe work procedures including orientation specific to their workplace. Workers should also know procedures when working alone and where to go and who to call for first aid assistance. Click here to download the OS&H Toolkit for Small Businesses. It includes sample Safety Inspection Checklists. To come up with a checklist specific to your business needs, contact us about our Training Services. TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up to date with OHS Regulations and Safety Standards. Let us help you to prevent Avoidable Fines & Penalties. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_title] => The 19 Point Safety Checklist That Will Save Your Company Thousands (From OHS Regulations & Penalties): Part 2 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-19-point-safety-checklist-that-will-save-your-company-thousands-from-ohs-regulations-penalties-part-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/services/ https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 14:50:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 14:50:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7264 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

The 19 Point Safety Checklist That Will Save Your Company Thousands (From OHS Regulations & Penalties): Part 1 The development and maintenance of an effective Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Program is vital to preventing injuries and other accidents at your business. It’s also a key to saving your business from Occupational Health and Safety […]

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The 19 Point Safety Checklist That Will Save Your Company Thousands (From OHS Regulations & Penalties): Part 1

The development and maintenance of an effective Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Program is vital to preventing injuries and other accidents at your business. It’s also a key to saving your business from Occupational Health and Safety regulation penalties.

Canadian Company: Legal Cases

In 2016, one Canadian Based Company was fined $1 million after one worker died and another was critically injured by a Rock Crushing Machine while attempting to clear a jam. In 2013, a separate company based in Canada was fined $250,000, and two of its directors received 25-day jail sentences for infractions that led to the death of a warehouse worker. And those are just a few cases. To protect your business from workplace injuries as well as from thousands of dollars in OSHA fines, we’ve compiled a 19-point safety checklist for your company. This checklist covers a few of the most common workplace Health and Safety topics and hazards. It’s not an extensive list, but should be used as a "General Responsibilities List" that should be modified for your specific business needs.

This week, we will cover the first 10 of 19 Safety Points.

The remaining 9 Points will be considered in next week's article.

1. Written Instructions

OHS Regulation Section 3.3 (c) requires businesses to include “appropriate written instructions available for reference by all workers.” These instructions should be posted in an easy-to-access area and should be clean and readable. The material should also be updated frequently to match any changes to your business. The procedures should list the steps to perform a task safely. Below are some of the activities where the OHS requires written instructions: - Lockout - Confined Space Entry - Fall Protection - Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) - Violence in the Workplace - Emergency Evacuation

2. Floors and Walkways

Floors should be free of loose material, debris, and worn carpeting. It’s also important to have plans in place to avoid slippery, oily, or wet floors. Aisles should be clear of material and equipment and be at least one meter wide. Also, if supplies or materials are stored on the floor, they should be stacked no more than three boxes high and kept away from doors and aisles.

3. Fire Safety and Security

OHS Regulations part 31 deals with Fire Safety. All fire extinguishers should be clearly marked and properly installed. Fire extinguishers need to have been inspected in the last year with workers trained to use them. Flammable liquids should be properly stored with appropriate smoke, fire, and burglar alarms in place. Emergency phone numbers should be placed close to phones, and if space heaters are used, they should be set to shut off automatically if tipped over.

4. Stairs, Ladders, and Platforms

Part 13 of the OHS Regulations states that ladders must be in safe and good condition with anti-slip treads. Stair handrails should be securely fastened to the wall and maintained. Stairwells should also be kept clear of materials and equipment.

5. Lighting

Lighting levels must be adequate for work areas including being free of glare or excessive lighting contrast as described in Sections 4.64 - 4.69. Task lighting should be provided in areas of low light or high glare. If windows are present, they should be covered with blinds, drapes or other means of controlling the light. Emergency lighting should also be checked for functionality.

6. Storage

Supplies and materials should be stored properly on shelves to minimize lifting problems, explains OHS Section 4.43. For heavy items, trolleys or dollies should be available, which means floors around shelves should be clear of rubbish.

7. Electrical

Electrical cords should be in good repair and secured to avoid tripping or electrical hazards, state Section 19. Clear access should be available to electrical panels and switch gear, and if required, ground fault circuit interrupters should be available. Plugs, sockets, and switches should be in good condition, and proper plugs should be used. Workers who interact with electrical circuits and connections must be adequately trained, and all energized equipment must be labeled as dangerous.

8. Equipment and Machinery

According to Section 12, equipment and machinery should be kept clean and regularly maintained. Start and stop switches should be clearly marked and within easy reach with operators properly trained. Machinery should also be adequately guarded with a lockout procedure in place. Within the space that contains the equipment, noise levels, fumes, and exhaust should be controlled.

9. Entrances and Exits

All emergency exit signs should be checked to ensure they are working and those exits should be clear of materials and equipment. The key is to provide safe access for workers and customers.

10. First Aid

According to OHS Code Part 1, an adequate and complete First Aid Kit should be accessible and clearly labeled. It should be kept clean and dry, with emergency numbers clearly displayed. A first aid responder should also be designated by the employer to provide first aid to workers at the work site. To come up with a checklist specific to your business needs, contact us about our Training Services. TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up to date with OHS Regulations and Safety Standards. Let us help you to prevent Avoidable Fines & Penalties. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_title] => The 19 Point Safety Checklist That Will Save Your Company Thousands (From OHS Regulations & Penalties): Part 1 [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-19-point-safety-checklist-your-company-will-save-thousands-from-ohs-regulation-penalties [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/services/ https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 14:52:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 14:52:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7243 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

 12 OSHA Fines That Can Be Avoided with the Right Equipment

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 12 OSHA Fines That Can Be Avoided with the Right Equipment

Millions of people work in dangerous environments across the nation on any given day.

In 2015, there were 232,629 workplace-related injuries in Canada, according to the Association of Workers’ Compensation Boards of Canada. And out of those injuries, there were 852 fatalities. It’s a terrifying prospect, not just for employees but also for employers. The key to protecting your company and your employees is Workplace Safety and Training. The proper workplace safety, training, and equipment can ensure that not only are your employees protected from injury and fatality; it can also save you money in the long run. OSHA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, is the organization in charge of reviewing your businesses safety standards. And if you fail in any area, your company could face hefty fines.

Starting in August 2016, your business could face the following fines:

  • 1.) Other than serious violation: $12,600 maximum penalty
  • 2.) Serious violation: $12,600 maximum penalty
  • 3.) Willful violation: $126,000 maximum penalty
  • 4.) Repeat violation: $126,000 maximum penalty
  1. So, how can you ensure that your business avoids these new, higher fines? The following includes a list of the top 12 OSHA fines that can easily be avoided if you have the right equipment.

  2.  1. Respiratory Protection

In 2015, there were 3,305 citations related to respiratory protection (1910.134). The standard is to protect employees who work around harmful dust, fog, fumes, mists, gasses, smokes, sprays, and vapors. OSHA sets expectations for control measures, respirator use, cleaning and repair, written programs, and worker medical evaluations. Equipment Needed: Your company is required to use respirators that fit the OSHA respirator standard. OSHA provides an “Advisor Genius” to help you find the respirators that fit your business. There are a few factors to consider: It must match the type and amount of hazardous exposure at your business. The respirator should take into account your job-site and worker characteristics.

2. Scaffolding

In 2015, there were 4,295 citations regarding scaffolding (1926.451). According to OSHA, scaffolding places workers at risk of falls, slips or strikes by falling objects. To avoid a fine, you must follow a specific set of requirements for the design, construction, and use of scaffolds. Equipment Needed: To avoid a fine, your scaffolding should meet a few key standards: fall arrest systems, guardrail height, crossbracing, mid rails, footings, platforms, ties and braces, and capacity. See the full details HERE.

3. Hazard Communication

There were 5,192 citations of hazard communication in 2015 (1910.1200). This standard addresses chemical hazards produced or used in the workplace and governs how those hazards are communicated to workers through things like labels, safety data sheets, and classification standards. Equipment Needed: To avoid a hefty fine, your company must follow the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). HERE is a course on this very topic. The Required Equipment is simple; you’ll need personal protective equipment that matches your list of chemicals on site as well as material safety data sheets (MSDS) and harmonized labels and other forms of warning written out.

4. Fall Protection

In 2015, there were 6,721 citations due to falling protection standards (1926.501). These standards were designed to prevent falls, the leading cause of death in construction. This section sets requirements for employers to provide fall protection to employees working or walking on surfaces that may be unstable or have unprotected sides and edges. Equipment Needed: Depending on your business situation, your required equipment could include guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems.

5. Head Protection

Head protection standards (1915.155) refer to standards that protect workers from injuries caused by falling or flying objects, or by bumping the head against a fixed object. Equipment Needed: Workers must wear a protective helmet (hard hat) when working in risk areas where there is a potential for head injury from falling objects. Workers must also wear a protective helmet to reduce the risk of electrical shock and burns.

6. Wiring Design and Protection

The Wiring Design & Protection Standards (1926.404) refer to a set of regulations that protect against the most common hazard on construction sites: ground fault electrical shock. Most fines occur due to unsafe equipment, poor installation, or unsafe work practices. Equipment Needed: The regulations require the employer to use either ground fault circuit interrupter equipment or and assured equipment grounding conductor program.

7. Ladders

All Ladders in your workplace must be capable of supporting a variety of loads without failure. These set of standards (1926.1053) protect employees from falls and other injuries relating to ladder safety. Equipment Needed: All ladders must have rungs, cleats, and steps that are parallel, level, and uniformly spaced. There are also three types of ladders to consider at your workplace: self-supporting portable ladders, portable ladders (not self-supporting), fix ladders. Ladders must be able to hand at least four times the maximum intended load (portable and self-supporting) or at least two loads of 114 kg each (fix ladders).

8. Aerial Lifts

An aerial lift is any vehicle-mounted device used to elevate personnel. The Standards (1926.453) refer to extendable boom platforms, aerial ladders, articulating (jointed) boom platforms, vertical towers, and any other combination. The standards protect your employees from falls, tip-overs, ejections, collapses, electrical shock, and more. Equipment Needed: To avoid a fine, there are a few things to consider:
  • A body belt must be worn and a lanyard attached to the boom or basket.
  • Wheel chocks shall be installed before using an aerial lift.
  • Upper and lower platform controls
  • All welding on equipment must conform to standards

9. Specific Excavation Requirements

Specific excavation requirements (1926.651) refer to those standards dealing with excavations on a job site. These standards can refer to utility installations such as sewer, telephone, fuel, electric, water lines, and more. Equipment Needed: There are a few pieces of equipment required to avoid fines on these sites. Those pieces include, but are not limited to:
  • Structural ramps and runways for employee access
  • Cleats or other appropriate means to connect runway structural members
  • Stairway, ladder, ramp, or other safe means of egress
  • Warning vests of other suitable garments to mark danger

10. Medical Services and First Aid

The Medical Services & First Aid Standard () (1915.87) refers to the emergency medical services and first aid measures that are readily accessible to employees. This includes such regulations and the number of employees trained as first aid providers on each worksite and the on-site clinic or infirmary. Equipment Needed: Depending on your worksite size and location, there are a few pieces of equipment that are required including an appropriate amount of first aid supplies located in a weatherproof container that is kept in a dry, sterile, and serviceable condition. Standard and Emergency First Aid Training is the best defense. For worksites where an employee may be splashed with a substance that could result in serious injury, quick drenching and flushing facilities are required. Other equipment includes stretches, lifting bridles, and more.

11. Eye and Face Protection

In 2016, there were 1,201 citations regarding eye and face protection (1926.102). This set of regulations ensures that each affected employee uses the appropriate eye or face protection for their job. It protects against such hazards as flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids, caustic liquids, chemical gasses or vapors, and injurious light radiation. Equipment Needed: The equipment required should match the potential hazards found in the job area. However, there are a few things to consider: 1. They shall fit snugly but not unduly interfere with movement. 2. They must be durable 3. They must be easily cleanable and capable of being disinfected

12. Foot Protection

Foot protection (1910.136) refers to the type of protective footwear that is appropriate for employees. These standards protect workers in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries from falling or rolling object, object piercing the sole, or electrical hazards. Equipment Needed: Protective footwear must meet ANSI Z41 or equivalent design requirements. There are a few things to consider: 1. Safety shoes may be required to provide special electrical conduction or insulation to prevent electric shock. 2. Chemical-resistant boots may be required to provide protection from caustic, reactive, toxic, or corrosive materials. 3. Slip-resistant soled shoes should be worn when working on slippery surfaces.
  • TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up to date with the essential and important industry practices to prevent avoidable accidents with our knowledge of Safety. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/
[post_title] => 12 OSHA Fines That Can Be Avoided with the Right Equipment [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 12-osha-fines-that-can-be-avoided-with-the-right-equipment [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 14:59:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 14:59:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7214 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

The Most Time Lost in the Construction Industry and 10 Ways Your Company Can Change This. Working in the construction industry Will be a dangerous career path if you ignore safety. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 9 in 1,000 full-time construction employees will experience a lost time injury due to contact with […]

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The Most Time Lost in the Construction Industry and 10 Ways Your Company Can Change This.

Working in the construction industry Will be a dangerous career path if you ignore safety. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 9 in 1,000 full-time construction employees will experience a lost time injury due to contact with objects or equipment. 4.5 in 1,000 employees will have a lost time injury due to overexertion. And 2.5 in 1,000 employees will lose out on work time due to a fall. Your company can help keep its employees on the job and out of the hospital by following these ten easy suggestions.

1. Develop an Injury and Illness Prevention Program

OSHA has discovered that companies with a Safety and Wellness Plan can reduce their lost time injuries anywhere from 9 to 60%. Having a program in place encourages your employees to maintain a safety mindset and follow the correct protocol on the construction site. A Safety and Wellness Plan may also prevent you from paying unexpected fines in the near future.

2. Conduct Regular Safety Meetings

Monthly Safety Meetings are an excellent way to monitor how well your on-site Injury and Illness Prevention Program is working. You can go over upcoming safety training and workplace accidents from the prior month at these meetings. You may also consider giving rewards and incentives to employees who stay safe through the month during these meetings. Employees are more likely to follow safety precautions if there is something in it for them.

3. Screen Future Employees

Not all individuals are built for construction work. You can limit the number of employees who are either inexperienced or unable to perform the job physically by screening them out from the get-go.

4. Do Not Skimp on Personal Protection Equipment (PPE)

You are legally required to provide your employees with the proper PPE that they need to do their jobs safely. Do not skimp on the quality of the PPE. Cheaper fall protection equipment may fail at a higher rate than a more expensive body harness would. For that reason - Some have seen the wisdom in paying for the best EQ possible in the short-term, so responsibility for someone's personal injury is mitigated in the long-term, and many have learned this the hard way - through experience.

5. Maintain Proper Staff Levels

Over time, being in a construction zone can easily lead to overexertion, especially when working in extreme temperatures. Give your employees adequate time to rest in between shifts by hiring enough staff members. We all know what it is like to be behind the gun on an important project, but to become lax in our safety habits due to this can become more costly than planning ahead of time to have the correct amount of people on the job site.

6. Proactively Identify Workplace Hazards

Identify potential safety hazards in your workplace before they cause an accident. One of the easiest ways to keep your employees from getting hurt on the job is to eliminate the hazardous situation that could harm them in the first place. At times the hazard may be the environment in which the construction worker is operating. If that aligns with your situation, help your employees to recognize potentially dangerous situations and understand the best methods to diffuse them.

7. Maintain Company Equipment

While most do maintain the companies equipment for the very important aspect of saving money by preserving the life of the equipment, some miss out on an even more important aspect of maintenance - Monthly Safety Operation Inspections of the equipment. Company equipment and vehicles need to be periodically inspected to ensure that they are still safe to operate. Many construction accidents occur because of faulty equipment. Keep your employees safe by performing monthly inspections.

8. Do Not Encourage Shortcuts

Make sure that your work instructions are up to date and easy to understand on all processes around the job site. Clear Communication will prevent employees from getting harmed because they did not know the proper steps in performing their job duties.

9. Keep a Tidy House

It is an obvious one but nonetheless, pivotal. The more junk and trash that is lying around the job site, the more likely it is that one of your employees will be hurt. Keep your construction site clutter free, and you may reduce the likelihood of one of your staff suffering a lost time injury.

10. Offer Regular Safety Training

If you do not provide regular safety training for your employees, you may not be complying with legal requirements, and you are increasing the likelihood of an on-site injury. If you need assistance on training employees who do not want to be trained, refer to our previous article on the matter by clicking HERE. TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up to date with the essential and important industry practices to prevent avoidable accidents with our knowledge of Safety. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_title] => The Most Time Lost on Average in the Construction Industry and 10 Ways Your Company Can Change This [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-most-time-lost-on-average-in-the-construction-industry-and-10-ways-your-company-can-change-this [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/course/wilderness-awareness/ https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 15:04:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 15:04:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7198 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

The 5 Most Common Accidents in the Long-Haul Trucking Industry (And How to Avoid Them) Trucking is a dangerous business. Long-haul truck drivers are 12 times more likely to die on the job and three times more likely to have a work-related injury that requires time off than the general work population. Most truckers worry […]

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The 5 Most Common Accidents in the Long-Haul Trucking Industry

(And How to Avoid Them)

Trucking is a dangerous business. Long-haul truck drivers are 12 times more likely to die on the job and three times more likely to have a work-related injury that requires time off than the general work population. Most truckers worry about dying in a pile-up, but other types of accidents can take their toll as well. As a follow up to our "The 7 Most Common Accidents In The Construction Industry (And How To Avoid Them)", we will now take a look at "The 5 Most Common Accidents In The Long-Haul Trucking Industry" and how truckers can best avoid them.

1. Transition from Sitting to Moving: Musculoskeletal Injuries on the Rise

It is no secret that truck drivers sit for hours on end. But the transition from sitting to doing even moderate activity like wiping down the windshields or pumping gas can be a dangerous time for truckers. A ‘Musculoskeletal Disorder’ (MSD) worker injury is when non-impact overexertion or bodily reaction affects nerves, tendons, muscles, or supporting body structure that happens over time. According to OHS statistics for 2010, 66% of all truck driver injury claims were MSD-related. The most common MSD claims involve overextending oneself while picking up or transporting boxes. To protect workers from MSD injuries, management should have a commitment to the ergonomic process, according to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. They should involve workers in the decision-making process. Training should play a key role in reducing these occurrences. They should encourage early reporting of problems by their workers. Finally, they should implement solutions to control problems and evaluate progress.

2. Missteps: Causing Serious Injury - Falling from Elevation

1 out of 150 truck drivers will file a time off claim due to a fall from elevation each year, representing about 10 percent of the industry’s injuries each year. One trucker recalled exiting his truck, slipping in some mud on his step, and falling. He caught himself on his hands and toes resulting in his right shoulder becoming dislocated. Most of these accidents involve falling from the truck to the ground below. A much smaller fraction involves falling to a lower level, falling on stairs, and falling into openings. The most common injuries are back, and knee sprains as a result of falling from the truck to the ground. Safety and Health Magazine suggested these tips to prevent falling from an elevation:
  • Use the “three-point rule:” Have at least one foot and two hands or two feet and one hand on the truck at all times.
  • Always use the mounting handles and stepping surfaces when entering or exiting the vehicle.
  • Use an employer-provided ladder to access the top of a load.
  • Face the edge of the truck bed, so you know your clearance.

3. Trips and Falls - The Dangers of Falls on the Same Level

One driver recalled a time when he was putting chains on his truck’s tires and slipped on some ice, whereupon he fell on his side causing serious injury and requiring time off work. This is not an isolated case. One in 170 truck drivers will lose work days because of a fall on the same level. This represents about nine percent of the total missed work days. Back and knee sprains are the most common injuries from the falls on the same level category. The National Institute of Health recommends that employers take multidimensional preventative actions including a review of organizational practices and policies, work environment, health management programming, and training. They also advise companies to take into account whether their workforce is aging and whether this will have an impact on the number of falls from the same level they are likely to experience.

4. “Watch Out!” - Struck by or Against Injuries

One driver was hitching his loaded trailer to his truck when his truck rolled over him, causing serious injuries. Another was watching as a forklift operator loaded his trailer. Unfortunately, the operator was not careful and it ran into him. Being struck by a large, moving object is a hazard in trucking. It is something that causes one out of 100 trucking company employees to take time off work each year. According to WCF insurance, truckers should heed the following tips to minimize their chances of being injured by a moving vehicle:
  • Always wear proper protective gear
  • Don’t work under heavy machinery
  • Inspect your tools to make sure proper guards are in place
  • Maintain visual contact
  • Wear visible vests
  • Do not carry passengers unless there is a passenger seat

5. Vehicle-Related Injuries - The Truck Crash

The injury that every truck driver dreads is the “vehicle-related injury” or truck crash. Fortunately, this is the least common type of calamity on the list. Unfortunately, it still causes one in 200 drivers to take time off work each year. Truck crashes can result from any number of causes including driver error, mechanical failure, or improper loading. Roughly nine percent of truck drivers’ worker’s compensation claims are due to vehicle-related injuries. Drivers can decrease operator-related incidents by getting the proper amount of sleep, develop fatigue management skills, wearing their seat belts, maintaining awareness of the road around them, and not using electronic devices while in the cab. Employers can ensure that fleets are properly maintained, and loads are stacked correctly. Training of drivers, mechanics, and loaders can go a long way toward reducing vehicle-related injuries.

Conclusion

One in 13 truck drivers has an on-the-job injury serious enough to merit taking time off work each year. It’s one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. Drivers can reduce their vulnerability by being aware of what is likely to cause such accidents and taking reasonable measures to prevent them. After all, no one likes being hurt. But fleets also have a role in providing the proper equipment, training, and procedures to ensure that injuries do not occur. In the company’s case, your bottom line is at stake. TriTech Safety & Training Inc, located in Grande Prairie is in the best position to keep you up to date with the essential and important industry practices to prevent avoidable accidents with our knowledge of Safety. For more information go to https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_title] => The 5 Most Common Accidents in the Long-Haul Trucking Industry (And How to Avoid Them) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-5-most-common-accidents-in-the-long-haul-trucking-industry-and-how-to-avoid-them [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/courses/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 15:06:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 15:06:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=7185 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Viewpoint There are employers and even some employees that consider Occupational Health and Safety Training to be a costly exercise that some think only leads to the disruption of business operations. The result of this dangerous assumption over time has caused a lot of workstation accidents due to bad workplace health and safety procedures. Results […]

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Viewpoint

There are employers and even some employees that consider Occupational Health and Safety Training to be a costly exercise that some think only leads to the disruption of business operations. The result of this dangerous assumption over time has caused a lot of workstation accidents due to bad workplace health and safety procedures.

Results

Statistics for lack of safety have reported: injuries, higher mortality rates, health complications, as well as a temporary and permanent incapacitation of many workers. The importance of Occupational Health and Safety Training for the entire company is critical to the overall protection and good will of both employees and employers. No matter the size of your business, here are some valid reasons why Occupational Health and Safety Training for both you and your employees will change the way you think about everything.

1. A Safe Workplace Is a Safe Business

Investors look at many things before putting their funds into a company. One of the criteria investors use in determining the prospects of a business is the safety procedures in use at the workplace because of the fear of possible lawsuits that could wipe out their profits and investment in the future. In order to boost the confidence of investors in your company, it is imperative that you organize regular safety training. If you want to make your business more profitable through effective management structure that respects all Statutory Occupational Health and Safety Laws as well as Regulations, then you will need to request the services of an excellent Safety Training company like Tritech Safety.

2. Every Work Environment Has Risks

It is very easy for some to assume that their industry does not pose enough risk to warrant required training. Due to a lack of understanding about what Occupational Health and Safety really means, many companies have unknowingly opened a wide workplace gap that lends an opportunity to unnecessary tragedy. Ignorance is not bliss in this setting. Falls, repetitive stress injuries, lack of signage and faulty equipment have all caused countless injuries as well as plagued almost every industry over time and could have easily been avoided

3. You Will Find Out About Obligations You May Have Never Known You Had

If you work for a company or organization, then this precious safety training might show you areas of responsibility that you never knew you had. One such case involved a supervisor going to prison!

4. Occupational Health and Safety Training Is a Business Promotion Strategy

With regular safety training for your employees, your brand can become more highly regarded by consumers (Think quality and safe-feeling brands that people trust more). Since companies operate as more of a complete unit instead of just individual sections, then the importance of good production and service standards flow through better, all of which creates a healthy and strong workplace culture. This happy and protected workplace culture cannot help but shine through even for product marketing and client retention (Have you ever felt better when a happy and confident person picks up the phone to take your order?).

5. You Will Understand the Real Consequences of Workplace Accidents, Illnesses and Injuries

The cost of accidents, illnesses, and injuries at the workplace almost always goes beyond what most employers and employees think. Undergoing regular safety training will make you understand the consequences of having to pay through your nose for lawsuits, fines and insurance costs rising from workplace accidents that could have been avoided or minimized through the regular training of staff.

6. Occupational Health and Safety Training Improves Employees Productivity

Complying with the OSHA standards that started in 1970 has shown to have long-term employee productivity effects. Apart from maximizing a worker's optimum productivity levels, it also boosts an employees’ confidence and promotes more engagement with company goals as well as aspirations. Standard safety training has proven to be essential in gaining optimum productivity.

7. It Is A Win-Win Opportunity For You and Your Employees

Awareness on issues like reduced medical costs, non-disruption of business activities and increased production will change the thinking of any manager. Safety training professionals will highlight the gains everyone stands to receive and help change the misconception among some managers that only employees benefit from such training.

8. You Will Understand Why Occupational Health and Safety Training Is Not A Waste of Time

If you view safety training as a waste of resources because you see no immediate face value, or return, think again. A Professional OHS Training Company like Tritech Safety will help you visualize the consequences of avoidable workplace accidents and injuries. Lawsuits and or prison time have immediate effects on any companies bottom line. [post_title] => 8 Reasons Occupational Health & Safety Training Will Change The Way You Think About Everything [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-reasons-occupational-health-safety-training-will-change-the-way-you-think-about-everything [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/contact/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 15:08:58 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 15:08:58 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=6906 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Important Construction is very relevant to all parts of the world and provides critical support to our much-needed infrastructures. There are millions of people today who currently work in the Construction Industry. The dangers involved in this line of work may vary depending on which particular aspect or niche you work in. Danger Hotspots In […]

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Important

Construction is very relevant to all parts of the world and provides critical support to our much-needed infrastructures. There are millions of people today who currently work in the Construction Industry. The dangers involved in this line of work may vary depending on which particular aspect or niche you work in.

Danger Hotspots

In this article, we will be discussing the most common accidents that occur in the Construction Industry. This overview can help you, and your company take a look at the hotspots, or most problematic areas so that you can be forewarned. It has been said, “To be forewarned is to be forearmed.”

1. Falls

Most construction jobs require working at great heights with the use of ladders and scaffolds. Accidents occur when workers fall from scaffolding or ladders which in turn leads to head injuries, a broken spine, fractures and other broken bones. Accidents and injuries from heights can be avoided through the use of protective gear such as helmets, elbow and knee pads, and a girdle to prevent accidental falls. Ladders should be secured, tightened and correctly placed. Walkways should also be guarded properly in areas where there is scaffolding so as to make the access to the site safe.

2. Falling Objects

Falling objects from a high up location (as well as not so high depending on the weight of the object) is a very common and easily avoidable accident. However, it can be known to cause severe injuries to the body, most especially the head, shoulders, and back. Injuries from falling objects could vary from slight cuts and bruises to more serious head and brain injuries. This can all be avoided by wearing a helmet, protective gear and maintaining proper communication amongst workers at the construction site. Always keep a clean and organized workspace and secure all tools or hardware while working at any elevation.

3. Tripping Accidents

Tripping over objects such as cables, blocks or falling into holes dug in the ground at construction sites happens more often than many people would like to admit. You can help avoid or minimize these types of accidents by clearing away dangerous objects from the construction site and following the simple advice previously mentioned, which is always to keep a neat and orderly working environment. Also placing an "out of bounds" sign at hazardous locations of the site can help improve worker safety.

4. Faulty Equipment

It is the responsibility of each construction worker to check that the equipment that they are using is in good working condition before use. If the equipment is the property of the company that they work for, then each worker should report the faulty device immediately and stop all use of said item. Should any equipment become broken, it should be repaired immediately so as to avoid any form of accident or injury.

5. Heavy Equipment and Automobile Accidents

There is usually a lot of movement going on at a construction site at any given time. Heavy equipment operators are trained to keep an eye out for movement around them; however, it is important to have regular communication happening between drivers, safety staff, and the logistics team. Note: An efficient way to cut down on fuel truck traffic for heater refills is to use a Nakoda high-efficiency heater. One study showed that a single Nakoda heater replaced more than six commonly used heaters and required one refill per day instead of multiples in the same day. Another common accident with vehicles is from the workers themselves not having a clearly marked location for parking or transiting which can result in hitting pedestrians or other fellow construction workers. Make sure to always have clearly marked parking zones and designated pedestrian walking areas with necessary signage.

6. Noise Hazards

Construction work requires heavy machinery and loud equipment which can become deafening to a degree if no precaution is taken. Powerful vibrations are also emitted from select devices. A loud and moving environment can lead to hearing loss or numbness over time for workers. You can help prevent this by wearing the proper ear protection (Ear Defenders). Where possible, try reducing the level of noise at locations that can permit it at select times of the day. Vibration from power tools can cause nerve damage to the limbs which could lead to loss of grip strength. Make sure everyone is trained in the proper safety procedures for how long each device can safely be used for and how best to handle said equipment.

7. Accidents Due to Irritants and Harmful Substances

Our last common accident listed here in the Construction Industry is coming in contact with or inhaling a toxic substance or chemical. This can be prevented by wearing a gas mask, body suit, gloves and using proper skin protection. For a more detailed look at the best protection courses for your particular industry, please contact TriTech Safety located in Grande Prairie to get the best advice on how to avoid the most common, expensive, and avoidable accidents in your industry. [post_title] => The 7 Most Common Accidents In The Construction Industry (And How To Avoid Them) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => the-7-most-common-accidents-in-the-construction-industry-and-how-to-avoid-them [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/contact/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 15:12:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 15:12:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=6897 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Following The Rules You are a cautious business owner who has been careful over the years to comply with all of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations that you have ever found out about. You are to be commended and congratulated for giving your company, and company employees the very best. However, it may come […]

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Following The Rules

You are a cautious business owner who has been careful over the years to comply with all of the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations that you have ever found out about. You are to be commended and congratulated for giving your company, and company employees the very best. However, it may come as a surprise to you to know that there are a handful of common safety violations that you possibly did not know about that could one day warrant an unwanted fine or penalty. Please take a moment and review the following checklist to help ensure that your business is in compliance:

1. Not Reporting Accidents On Time

Did you know that your company is supposed to record all accidents, both severe and minor? It is very easy to think that only major accidents should be reported. You should have a special register which is for recording all accidents at the workplace. These accidents include those that could have harmed anyone but did not. You should inform the OH&S of accidents promptly and on time.

2. Not Adhering to Appropriate Engineering Regulations

Occupational Health and Safety Inspectors want your company to provide a safe workplace that conforms with all known OHS Regulations. Make sure that your company does not bypass important standards in daily schedules or activities. Regulators want to know and see that everyone in the company has put in the appropriate amount of effort to implement all required safety regulations.
An important thing to look out for: Make sure that you are adhering to all engineering standards on noise and health hazards that an employee faces at the workplace.
 

3. Doing Nothing About Identified Hazards

This is one of the most serious violations that OSHA inspectors do not like seeing because it smacks of gross irresponsibility and a lack of concern for your employees’ safety. Regulators will probably come down heavily on you if they discover that you have conducted a safety audit, identified some serious hazards and did nothing about it. OSHA demands that you fix any safety issue discovered during a safety review.
It is highly advisable to address what you have discovered during a safety audit as soon as possible.

4. Not Enforcing Safety Rules

This could lead to the shutting down of your business or workplace. OSHA regulators will want to know if all strictly obey safety rules, regulations, and Codes in your organization. Not enforcing safety regulations both internal and external can land you a serious fine from an OSHA inspector.

5. Not Having a Systematic Approach to Safety

What are the emergency plans that your company has set in place for accidents, injuries, and other workplace hazards? Do you have a compliance system in place? Inspectors like to see what systematic approach to injuries and accidents you currently have setup so that in the event of an emergency everyone present knows how to act and what next steps to take. This is something that many companies unknowingly disregard and can pay the price in many different ways.
Make sure that necessary details are clearly displayed to everyone in the company.
Here is a simple example of an important safety detail: Make sure that all staff members know exactly where safety clothing and equipment is kept. Ready access to this kind of information is a must.
Make sure to always stay up to date on all Occupational Health and Safety Regulations. A professional safety training company like TriTech can show you how to conduct a thorough workplace safety audit and draw up the perfect template for addressing potential hazards. [post_title] => A Safety Violation You Didn’t Know You Were Doing But Might Start Getting Fined For [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => a-safety-violation-you-didnt-know-you-were-doing-but-might-start-getting-fined-for [to_ping] => [pinged] => https://tritechsafety.ca/services/ [post_modified] => 2019-11-29 15:23:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2019-11-29 15:23:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://tritechsafety.ca/?p=6876 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )
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